Top 10 Restaurants in Singapore

Singapore food 4

Singapore is a city-state known for its cleanliness, its multiculturalism and most of all for its abilities as a place to do business.  

However, foodies amongst us will also recognise it as one of the top destinations in the world to eat out in. Even if you’ve found the perfect serviced apartments in Singapore for short stay, the likelihood is that you’re not going to want to stay in and cook very often, not with the fantastic alternatives on offer. 

Singapore’s amazing range of cuisines is thanks to its immigrant population. A population that has been coming and going for many years thanks to the country’s long term standing as a world seaport. 

The Malays are native Singaporeans and have the greatest influence over the cuisine on offer. However, this is closely followed by two of the world’s most favourite cuisines, Chinese and Indian. 

Mix these in with a multitude of other influences from Europe, especially British and Portuguese, and Asia, prominently Sri Lankan, Thai and Middle Eastern. You are left with an overall offering to tantalise every palate. Sometimes even a single restaurant can offer a multitude of cuisines or its dishes can be an interesting mixture. 

Here are ten of the best restaurants you can find in Singapore:

Candlenut 

The chef, Malcolm Lee, is a native Singaporean who uses many family influences to produce a menu that is derived from Peranakan culture, Chinese settlers in the Malay region. Dished include grandfather’s curry, crab meat and pickled shallots served in a pastry cup. Be sure to keep a little room for dessert, Candlenut is renowned for them. 

Spring Court 

This is a classic example of a restaurant whose menu changes with the times and is open to influences by the culture it is surrounded by. Originally a straight up Cantonese restaurant, it now opens up to a vast range of Chinese cuisines, as well as being influenced by outside cultures, such as Fijian. 

Bam! 

Bam! demonstrates exactly the kind of fusion cooking that makes Singapore restaurants so highly thought of. This restaurant successfully combines Japanese produce made with Western techniques. The dishes are brightly coloured, complicated and are changed every day, meaning that regular visitors never have the same menu twice. 

Empress 

If you’re looking for a restaurant with a fabulous location then Empress is sure to impress. It’s located within the grounds surrounding the Asian Civilisations Museum and if that’s not enough, it has waterside views too! If you want to know about the cuisine, it’s traditional Cantonese, with a major concentration on quality pork dishes. 

Folklore 

Another exponent of Peranakan food, this restaurant also has a menu with strong leanings towards Eurasian cuisine. Some of the dishes that are produced here are years old, completely unique and can’t be found anywhere else in Singapore. You’ll also see the chefs preparing food in the old fashioned way too, hand picking flesh and grinding spices with a pestle and mortar. 

Open Farm Community 

A truly unique experience. This is a restaurant that has a farm in its back garden which supplies a lot of its ingredients! The menu is Vietnamese/Chinese in the main and the decor is vintage country home. 

Imperial Treasure Super Peking Duck 

Any guesses what the number one dish is here? The Peking Duck takes centre stage and it is widely thought of as the best you can get in the city. It is served and sliced with a flourish tableside. Firstly you get some slices for dipping, secondly, the rest is taken back to the kitchen and prepared how you like it. 

Kok Sen Restaurant 

Upon arriving, you’ll be forgiven for thinking you’ve in some cheap cafe, with the plastic stools and tables. Don’t worry, the same family has been serving Cantonese food at this humble restaurant for the last 50 years. You’re in for a treat! 

Hajah Maimunah 

A Malaysian and Indonesian food specialist which also has many dishes that combine the two. There are over thirty dishes to choose from on the menu so it’s easy to find something that appeals. The food is handily pictured so ordering is a case of pointing before it is served up on a plate of rice. 

Corner House 

Are you one of those people who hates being served their food on a plate and being expected to eat with a knife and fork? The eclectic collection of crockery and cutlery at Corner House might be tempting for you. The cuisine is ultra modern and beautifully presented onto a startling array of artefacts.  

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