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Area Guides-London

Aldgate

The East London neighborhood of Aldgate has a fascinating history that is defined both by the poverty of the Victorian era and by the opulence of the city’s main financial hub. A much sought-after destination for tourists and business travelers thanks to its handy transport links and close proximity to the City of London, there is also plenty of things to see and do that can entertain visitors in their downtime.

Here are the top 5 attractions in Aldgate we recommend to experience the best of the neighborhood:

 

  • Heron Tower

 

The third tallest building in London, Heron Tower was completed in 2011 and boasts some of the most spectacular views of the city available, while also offering various dining options to visitors. It is impossible to miss this building when walking through town, with the tower’s silhouette dominating the skyline of London’s financial district.

 

  • The Gherkin

 

Another iconic building in the City of London, the Gherkin’s distinctive shape makes it instantly recognizable from anywhere in the area. Why not head to the top level on the 40th floor and sip coffee while enjoying a 360-degree view of London? A great way of feeling on top of the world.

 

  • Sky Garden

 

This famous enlarged glass dome of Fenchurch Street is dedicated to three floors of exquisitely landscaped public gardens, not to mention some of London’s most exclusive social spaces, such as observation decks and an open-air terrace. Within easy walking distance of Aldgate station, Sky Garden also boasts a number of excellent restaurants for visitors to enjoy, among them Fenchurch Seafood Bar & Grill, Sky Pod Bar, and Darwin Brasserie.

 

  • Tower of London

 

An iconic London attraction, the Norman castle is known as the Tower of London was first founded by William The Conqueror in 1078 and has existed as a prison and royal palace in its long history. Visitors can explore the inside and out of the White Tower, walls and other wings of the fortress, and the Tower also lies in close proximity to Tower Bridge, itself another of the city’s famous historic attractions.

 

  • Monument

 

The Monument to the Great Fire of London, known simply as the Monument, is a 200-foot Doric column that stands close to the spot in Pudding Lane where the Great Fire started in 1666. A Grade I listed monument, the column features a gilded urn of fire at its summit and a viewing platform 311 steps up, commanding excellent views over the city and river.

Museums in Aldgate

Aldgate is not just known as a travel and financial hub however: there is also plenty of history to discover in its local museums. Sometimes the best part about visiting a new city is getting to know the story behind it: the social progress and industrial development that makes a place what it is today. Museums frequently top the itineraries of tourists and new residents, and there are plenty in Aldgate that delivers on all the fun and engagement for which these cultural centers are renowned.

Here is a list of our top 5 museums and galleries in Aldgate:

 

  • Whitechapel Gallery

 

Opened in 1901, this public art gallery is one of the most impressive in the country and stands as a symbol of East London’s collective creative spirit. Hosting the works of primarily contemporary artists, both local and international, the gallery also organizes retrospective exhibitions and community events and was the first gallery in England to display the works of Pollock and Picasso to the public. Admission is free, but visitors are advised to leave a small donation.

 

  • Jack The Ripper Museum

 

The unsolved Jack The Ripper murders come to life in this Cable Street museum. Featuring original artifacts and waxwork recreations of the crime scenes, the museum carefully chronicles the events of the Ripper case and invites visitors to lend their own theories as to the identity of the notorious killer. A spooky but entertaining delve into London history, the Jack The Ripper Museum is a great attraction to add to the itinerary. Admission costs £10 for adults and £5 for children.

 

  • Bank of England Museum

 

Located within the historic institution itself, the Bank of England Museum on Bartholomew Lane displays a wide-ranging collection of exhibits detailing the history of the bank, from its foundation in 1694 to its modern workings. The displays include a reconstruction of a late 18th-century office, collections of notes, coins, books and documents, and a genuine gold bar that can be handled from within its Perspex box. Admission is free, making this museum a convenient and affordable stop if visitors are intending to explore the City’s financial district.

 

  • The Royal London Hospital Museum

 

The Royal London Hospital (formerly just the London Hospital) has cared for the people of East London since the mid 18th century, a storied past which is exhibited in the archives and collections of its associated museum. Visitors can find out about the hospital’s role in the development of modern medicine, as well as peruse material related to the famous case of Joseph Merrick, otherwise known as The Elephant Man. Entry is free, although donations are encouraged to help preserve the museum’s collection.

 

  • Guildhall Art Gallery

 

The Guildhall Art Gallery houses the extensive art collection of the City of London. Built on the site of London’s Roman amphitheater, the gallery was constructed in a semi-gothic style intended to be sympathetic to the original historic Guildhall, to which the gallery is internally connected. Among the 4,000 items currently on display within the building is the famous ‘Defeat of the Floating Batteries at Gibraltar’ by John Singleton Copley. Admission is free to all visitors, making trips here an inexpensive time killer.

Shopping in Aldgate

Aldgate and the surrounding area offer an incredibly broad range of shops for visitors to explore in their downtime. From the numerous independent stores dotted around the back roads to the global brands littered along the high street, there are plenty of options for tourists and new residents to explore. Where Aldgate truly shines, however, is in its markets. Petticoat Lane Market, for example, is a genuine piece of London history, as well as a great place to find quirky, independent fashion boutiques, while Brick Lane market offers everything from bespoke furniture to arts and crafts. Whatever is on the list, there will be somewhere to find it.

Here are the best places to shop in Aldgate we would recommend:

 

  • The Arcade

 

Hidden around the back of Liverpool Street Station, The Arcade epitomizes lunchtime in the City. With a host of cafes, kiosks, cobbler stalls and more, this is always a bustling destination at which to browse local wares and enjoy a coffee on the way.

 

  • Leadenhall Market

 

One of the oldest covered markets in London, Leadenhall Market dates back to the 14th century and is located in the historic center of the city’s financial district. The market is typically open weekdays from 10 am to 6 pm, and primarily sells fresh food and flowers. Independent butchers, cheesemongers, and florists manage stalls here, with a number of commercial retailers also located in the market.

 

  • Broadgate Circle

 

Finally opened after an extended construction period, Broadgate Circle offers craft beer, botanical cocktails, cutting-edge workout spaces, and street food right next to Liverpool Street station. Great for grabbing a bite to eat from the Japanese, Spanish and Italian menus available, the Circle is also furnished with a stunning amphitheater and several upper-level walkways with views down on the space. Plus in winter, space is turned into a skating rink, becoming a veritable local wonderland.

 

  • One New Change

 

One New Change is a major office and retail development near Aldgate, consisting of 560,000 square feet of floor space (both offices and retail space), and is the primary shopping center in the City of London. Sixty shops and restaurants are located within the expansive mall, including a large number of high street retailers, which is open seven days a week, unusual for the City. Pay a visit to H&M or Topshop for clothing, or perhaps to Barbecoa, the unique barbecue restaurant, and butcher jointly run by Jamie Oliver and Adam Perry-Lang, for some truly succulent cuisine.

 

  • Boxpark Shoreditch

 

Shoreditch’s famous pop-up mall, Boxpark fuses together the concepts of modern street food and the pairing of local and global brands to create a unique shopping and dining destination. Entirely constructed out of refitted shipping containers, Boxpark boasts numerous bars, eateries, lifestyle and clothing stores within its units, and is a perfect embodiment of the enterprising Shoreditch hipster.

Food and Drink in Aldgate

Exploring the varied cuisine on offer is one of the many perks of visiting a new city. London’s Aldgate district is home to a variety of bars and restaurants that will showcase a great array of tastes and flavors with every mouthful. From modern British treats to continental and Oriental cuisine, the area really does deliver for all palates.

Here are our top 5 best places for food and drink in Aldgate:

 

  • Treves & Hyde

 

A restaurant and coffee bar, Treves & Hyde uses the freshest seasonal ingredients in all its servings, sourced from caring local farmers. Continental-inspired dishes are served in a modern setting with outdoor seating options, and there are breakfast, lunch, dinner and weekend brunch menus all available.

Address: 15/17 Leman St, Whitechapel, London, E1 8EN

 

  • The Ten Bells

 

A classic British pub serving beer, wine, and cocktails, The Ten Bells is also an essential stop on any Jack The Ripper walk due to its association with victims Annie Chapman and Mary Kelly. Inject a little notoriety into that gastropub vibe with an infamous history and drinks across three floors.

Address: 84 Commercial St, Spitalfields, London, E1 6LY

 

  • VQ Aldgate

 

This 60 cover restaurant and 30 cover bar offer a stylish and contemporary design from its ground floor location in the four-star Dorsett City Hotel. Service is available for 24-hour eating and drinking, and there’s also a large outdoor seating area for those sunny summer days.

Address: Ground Floor Dorsett City Hotel, Aldgate High St, London, EC3N 1AH

 

  • Satyrio

 

A stylish fine-dining Italian restaurant and wine boutique, all of Satyrio’s meals use only the best fresh ingredients from gourmet producers. Seasonal menus and a superb wine list made up of curated Old and New World Tastes complete the experience, and the restaurant also plays host to various art exhibitions, live music and wine tastings throughout the year.

Address: 49 Aldgate High St, London, EC3N 1AL

 

  • Brick Lane

 

Brick Lane is a famous street in the East End of London that runs from Spitalfields to Swanfield Street in Bethnal Green. Known for its many curry houses and street markets, Brick Lane is today the heart of the Bangladeshi community in London and represents a history of successive communities of immigrants who settled into the area. Check out Aladin Indian Restaurant, Cinnamon Brick Lane and Eastern Eye Balti House for some of the best Indian food in the area.

Churches and Cathedrals in Aldgate

Despite the more secular societies in which many of us reside today, the stunning historic architecture of many old churches and cathedrals still attracts thousands of visitors every year. Exploring the places of worship around Aldgate is a great way of whiling away a few loose hours, and many of them can be easily viewed on many local walking tours of London.

For those interested in the architecture of religion, here are some of the most notable churches in the Aldgate area:

 

  • The Bevis Marks Synagogue

 

Officially known as Qahal Kadosh Sha'ar ha-Shamayim, the Bevish Marks Synagogue is the oldest synagogue in the UK in continuous use. First built in 1701, the synagogue is affiliated with the city’s historic Spanish and Portuguese Jewish community, and is a Grade I listed building.

 

  • St. Botolph’s

 

St. Botolph’s of Aldgate is an 18th century Church of England parish church constructed in a unique style: the current building features stone quoins and window casings with an obelisk spire. Undergoing several reconstructions over the years, the earliest records of a church on the site date back to 1115, though the foundations may date back to well before the Norman invasion of 1066.

The East London neighborhood of Aldgate has a fascinating history that is defined both by the poverty of the Victorian era and by the opulence of the city’s main financial hub. A much sought-after destination for tourists and business travelers thanks to its handy transport links and close proximity to the City of London, there is also plenty of things to see and do that can entertain visitors in their downtime.

Here are the top 5 attractions in Aldgate we recommend to experience the best in the neighborhood:

 

  • Heron Tower

 

The third tallest building in London, Heron Tower was completed in 2011 and boasts some of the most spectacular views of the city available, while also offering various dining options to visitors. It is impossible to miss this building when walking through town, with the tower’s silhouette dominating the skyline of London’s financial district.

 

  • The Gherkin

 

Another iconic building in the City of London, the Gherkin’s distinctive shape makes it instantly recognizable from anywhere in the area. Why not head to the top level on the 40th floor and sip coffee while enjoying a 360-degree view of London? A great way of feeling on top of the world.

 

  • Sky Garden

 

This famous enlarged glass dome of Fenchurch Street is dedicated to three floors of exquisitely landscaped public gardens, not to mention some of London’s most exclusive social spaces, such as observation decks and an open-air terrace. Within easy walking distance of Aldgate station, Sky Garden also boasts a number of excellent restaurants for visitors to enjoy, among them Fenchurch Seafood Bar & Grill, Sky Pod Bar, and Darwin Brasserie.

 

  • Tower of London

 

An iconic London attraction, the Norman castle is known as the Tower of London was first founded by William The Conqueror in 1078 and has existed as a prison and royal palace in its long history. Visitors can explore the inside and out of the White Tower, walls and other wings of the fortress, and the Tower also lies in close proximity to Tower Bridge, itself another of the city’s famous historic attractions.

 

  • Monument

 

The Monument to the Great Fire of London, known simply as the Monument, is a 200-foot Doric column that stands close to the spot in Pudding Lane where the Great Fire started in 1666. A Grade I listed monument, the column features a gilded urn of fire at its summit and a viewing platform 311 steps up, commanding excellent views over the city and river.

Museums in Aldgate

Aldgate is not just known as a travel and financial hub however: there is also plenty of history to discover in its local museums. Sometimes the best part about visiting a new city is getting to know the story behind it: the social progress and industrial development that makes a place what it is today. Museums frequently top the itineraries of tourists and new residents, and there are plenty in Aldgate that delivers on all the fun and engagement for which these cultural centers are renowned.

Here is a list of our top 5 museums and galleries in Aldgate:

 

  • Whitechapel Gallery

 

Opened in 1901, this public art gallery is one of the most impressive in the country and stands as a symbol of East London’s collective creative spirit. Hosting the works of primarily contemporary artists, both local and international, the gallery also organizes retrospective exhibitions and community events and was the first gallery in England to display the works of Pollock and Picasso to the public. Admission is free, but visitors are advised to leave a small donation.

 

  • Jack The Ripper Museum

 

The unsolved Jack The Ripper murders come to life in this Cable Street museum. Featuring original artifacts and waxwork recreations of the crime scenes, the museum carefully chronicles the events of the Ripper case and invites visitors to lend their own theories as to the identity of the notorious killer. A spooky but entertaining delve into London history, the Jack The Ripper Museum is a great attraction to add to the itinerary. Admission costs £10 for adults and £5 for children.

 

  • Bank of England Museum

 

Located within the historic institution itself, the Bank of England Museum on Bartholomew Lane displays a wide-ranging collection of exhibits detailing the history of the bank, from its foundation in 1694 to its modern workings. The displays include a reconstruction of a late 18th-century office, collections of notes, coins, books and documents, and a genuine gold bar that can be handled from within its Perspex box. Admission is free, making this museum a convenient and affordable stop if visitors are intending to explore the City’s financial district.

 

  • The Royal London Hospital Museum

 

The Royal London Hospital (formerly just the London Hospital) has cared for the people of East London since the mid 18th century, a storied past which is exhibited in the archives and collections of its associated museum. Visitors can find out about the hospital’s role in the development of modern medicine, as well as peruse material related to the famous case of Joseph Merrick, otherwise known as The Elephant Man. Entry is free, although donations are encouraged to help preserve the museum’s collection.

 

  • Guildhall Art Gallery

 

The Guildhall Art Gallery houses the extensive art collection of the City of London. Built on the site of London’s Roman amphitheater, the gallery was constructed in a semi-gothic style intended to be sympathetic to the original historic Guildhall, to which the gallery is internally connected. Among the 4,000 items currently on display within the building is the famous ‘Defeat of the Floating Batteries at Gibraltar’ by John Singleton Copley. Admission is free to all visitors, making trips here an inexpensive time killer.

Shopping in Aldgate

Aldgate and the surrounding area offer an incredibly broad range of shops for visitors to explore in their downtime. From the numerous independent stores dotted around the back roads to the global brands littered along the high street, there are plenty of options for tourists and new residents to explore. Where Aldgate truly shines, however, is in its markets. Petticoat Lane Market, for example, is a genuine piece of London history, as well as a great place to find quirky, independent fashion boutiques, while Brick Lane market offers everything from bespoke furniture to arts and crafts. Whatever is on the list, there will be somewhere to find it.

Here are the best places to shop in Aldgate we would recommend:

 

  • The Arcade

 

Hidden around the back of Liverpool Street Station, The Arcade epitomizes lunchtime in the City. With a host of cafes, kiosks, cobbler stalls and more, this is always a bustling destination at which to browse local wares and enjoy a coffee on the way.

 

  • Leadenhall Market

 

One of the oldest covered markets in London, Leadenhall Market dates back to the 14th century and is located in the historic center of the city’s financial district. The market is typically open weekdays from 10 am to 6 pm, and primarily sells fresh food and flowers. Independent butchers, cheesemongers, and florists manage stalls here, with a number of commercial retailers also located in the market.

 

  • Broadgate Circle

 

Finally opened after an extended construction period, Broadgate Circle offers craft beer, botanical cocktails, cutting-edge workout spaces, and street food right next to Liverpool Street station. Great for grabbing a bite to eat from the Japanese, Spanish and Italian menus available, the Circle is also furnished with a stunning amphitheater and several upper-level walkways with views down on the space. Plus in winter, space is turned into a skating rink, becoming a veritable local wonderland.

 

  • One New Change

 

One New Change is a major office and retail development near Aldgate, consisting of 560,000 square feet of floor space (both offices and retail space), and is the primary shopping center in the City of London. Sixty shops and restaurants are located within the expansive mall, including a large number of high street retailers, which is open seven days a week, unusual for the City. Pay a visit to H&M or Topshop for clothing, or perhaps to Barbecoa, the unique barbecue restaurant, and butcher jointly run by Jamie Oliver and Adam Perry-Lang, for some truly succulent cuisine.

 

  • Boxpark Shoreditch

 

Shoreditch’s famous pop-up mall, Boxpark fuses together the concepts of modern street food and the pairing of local and global brands to create a unique shopping and dining destination. Entirely constructed out of refitted shipping containers, Boxpark boasts numerous bars, eateries, lifestyle and clothing stores within its units, and is a perfect embodiment of the enterprising Shoreditch hipster.

Food and Drink in Aldgate

Exploring the varied cuisine on offer is one of the many perks of visiting a new city. London’s Aldgate district is home to a variety of bars and restaurants that will showcase a great array of tastes and flavors with every mouthful. From modern British treats to continental and Oriental cuisine, the area really does deliver for all palates.

Here are our top 5 best places for food and drink in Aldgate:

 

  • Treves & Hyde

 

A restaurant and coffee bar, Treves & Hyde uses the freshest seasonal ingredients in all its servings, sourced from caring local farmers. Continental-inspired dishes are served in a modern setting with outdoor seating options, and there are breakfast, lunch, dinner and weekend brunch menus all available.

Address: 15/17 Leman St, Whitechapel, London, E1 8EN

 

  • The Ten Bells

 

A classic British pub serving beer, wine, and cocktails, The Ten Bells is also an essential stop on any Jack The Ripper walk due to its association with victims Annie Chapman and Mary Kelly. Inject a little notoriety into that gastropub vibe with an infamous history and drinks across three floors.

Address: 84 Commercial St, Spitalfields, London, E1 6LY

 

  • VQ Aldgate

 

This 60 cover restaurant and 30 cover bar offer a stylish and contemporary design from its ground floor location in the four-star Dorsett City Hotel. Service is available for 24-hour eating and drinking, and there’s also a large outdoor seating area for those sunny summer days.

Address: Ground Floor Dorsett City Hotel, Aldgate High St, London, EC3N 1AH

 

  • Satyrio

 

A stylish fine-dining Italian restaurant and wine boutique, all of Satyrio’s meals use only the best fresh ingredients from gourmet producers. Seasonal menus and a superb wine list made up of curated Old and New World Tastes complete the experience, and the restaurant also plays host to various art exhibitions, live music and wine tastings throughout the year.

Address: 49 Aldgate High St, London, EC3N 1AL

 

  • Brick Lane

 

Brick Lane is a famous street in the East End of London that runs from Spitalfields to Swanfield Street in Bethnal Green. Known for its many curry houses and street markets, Brick Lane is today the heart of the Bangladeshi community in London, and represents a history of successive communities of immigrants who settled into the area. Check out Aladin Indian Restaurant, Cinnamon Brick Lane and Eastern Eye Balti House for some of the best Indian food in the area.

Churches and Cathedrals in Aldgate

Despite the more secular societies in which many of us reside today, the stunning historic architecture of many old churches and cathedrals still attracts thousands of visitors every year. Exploring the places of worship around Aldgate is a great way of whiling away a few loose hours, and many of them can be easily viewed on many local walking tours of London.

For those interested in the architecture of religion, here are some of the most notable churches in the Aldgate area:

 

  • The Bevis Marks Synagogue

 

Officially known as Qahal Kadosh Sha'ar ha-Shamayim, the Bevish Marks Synagogue is the oldest synagogue in the UK in continuous use. First built in 1701, the synagogue is affiliated with the city’s historic Spanish and Portuguese Jewish community, and is a Grade I listed building.

 

  • St. Botolph’s

 

St. Botolph’s of Aldgate is an 18th century Church of England parish church constructed in a unique style: the current building features stone quoins and window casings with an obelisk spire. Undergoing several reconstructions over the years, the earliest records of a church on the site date back to 1115, though the foundations may date back to well before the Norman invasion of 1066.

The East London neighborhood of Aldgate has a fascinating history that is defined both by the poverty of the Victorian era and by the opulence of the city’s main financial hub. A much sought-after destination for tourists and business travelers thanks to its handy transport links and close proximity to the City of London, there is also plenty of things to see and do that can entertain visitors in their downtime.

Here are the top 5 attractions in Aldgate we recommend to experience the best of the neighborhood:

 

  • Heron Tower

 

The third tallest building in London, Heron Tower was completed in 2011 and boasts some of the most spectacular views of the city available, while also offering various dining options to visitors. It is impossible to miss this building when walking through town, with the tower’s silhouette dominating the skyline of London’s financial district.

 

  • The Gherkin

 

Another iconic building in the City of London, the Gherkin’s distinctive shape makes it instantly recognizable from anywhere in the area. Why not head to the top level on the 40th floor and sip coffee while enjoying a 360-degree view of London? A great way of feeling on top of the world.

 

  • Sky Garden

 

This famous enlarged glass dome of Fenchurch Street is dedicated to three floors of exquisitely landscaped public gardens, not to mention some of London’s most exclusive social spaces, such as observation decks and an open-air terrace. Within easy walking distance of Aldgate station, Sky Garden also boasts a number of excellent restaurants for visitors to enjoy, among them Fenchurch Seafood Bar & Grill, Sky Pod Bar, and Darwin Brasserie.

 

  • Tower of London

 

An iconic London attraction, the Norman castle is known as the Tower of London was first founded by William The Conqueror in 1078, and has existed as a prison and royal palace in its long history. Visitors can explore the inside and out of the White Tower, walls and other wings of the fortress, and the Tower also lies in close proximity to Tower Bridge, itself another of the city’s famous historic attractions.

 

  • Monument

 

The Monument to the Great Fire of London, known simply as the Monument, is a 200-foot Doric column that stands close to the spot in Pudding Lane where the Great Fire started in 1666. A Grade I listed monument, the column features a gilded urn of fire at its summit and a viewing platform 311 steps up, commanding excellent views over the city and river.

Museums in Aldgate

Aldgate is not just known as a travel and financial hub however: there is also plenty of history to discover in its local museums. Sometimes the best part about visiting a new city is getting to know the story behind it: the social progress and industrial development that makes a place what it is today. Museums frequently top the itineraries of tourists and new residents, and there are plenty in Aldgate that delivers on all the fun and engagement for which these cultural centers are renowned.

Here is a list of our top 5 museums and galleries in Aldgate:

 

  • Whitechapel Gallery

 

Opened in 1901, this public art gallery is one of the most impressive in the country and stands as a symbol of East London’s collective creative spirit. Hosting the works of primarily contemporary artists, both local and international, the gallery also organises retrospective exhibitions and community events and was the first gallery in England to display the works of Pollock and Picasso to the public. Admission is free, but visitors are advised to leave a small donation.

 

  • Jack The Ripper Museum

 

The unsolved Jack The Ripper murders come to life in this Cable Street museum. Featuring original artifacts and waxwork recreations of the crime scenes, the museum carefully chronicles the events of the Ripper case and invites visitors to lend their own theories as to the identity of the notorious killer. A spooky but entertaining delve into London history, the Jack The Ripper Museum is a great attraction to add to the itinerary. Admission costs £10 for adults and £5 for children.

 

  • Bank of England Museum

 

Located within the historic institution itself, the Bank of England Museum on Bartholomew Lane displays a wide-ranging collection of exhibits detailing the history of the bank, from its foundation in 1694 to its modern workings. The displays include a reconstruction of a late 18th-century office, collections of notes, coins, books and documents, and a genuine gold bar that can be handled from within its Perspex box. Admission is free, making this museum a convenient and affordable stop if visitors are intending to explore the City’s financial district.

 

  • The Royal London Hospital Museum

 

The Royal London Hospital (formerly just the London Hospital) has cared for the people of East London since the mid 18th century, a storied past which is exhibited in the archives and collections of its associated museum. Visitors can find out about the hospital’s role in the development of modern medicine, as well as peruse material related to the famous case of Joseph Merrick, otherwise known as The Elephant Man. Entry is free, although donations are encouraged to help preserve the museum’s collection.

 

  • Guildhall Art Gallery

 

The Guildhall Art Gallery houses the extensive art collection of the City of London. Built on the site of London’s Roman amphitheater, the gallery was constructed in a semi-gothic style intended to be sympathetic to the original historic Guildhall, to which the gallery is internally connected. Among the 4,000 items currently on display within the building is the famous ‘Defeat of the Floating Batteries at Gibraltar’ by John Singleton Copley. Admission is free to all visitors, making trips here an inexpensive time killer.

Shopping in Aldgate

Aldgate and the surrounding area offer an incredibly broad range of shops for visitors to explore in their downtime. From the numerous independent stores dotted around the back roads to the global brands littered along the high street, there are plenty of options for tourists and new residents to explore. Where Aldgate truly shines, however, is in its markets. Petticoat Lane Market, for example, is a genuine piece of London history, as well as a great place to find quirky, independent fashion boutiques, while Brick Lane market offers everything from bespoke furniture to arts and crafts. Whatever is on the list, there will be somewhere to find it.

Here are the best places to shop in Aldgate we would recommend:

 

  • The Arcade

 

Hidden around the back of Liverpool Street Station, The Arcade epitomizes lunchtime in the City. With a host of cafes, kiosks, cobbler stalls and more, this is always a bustling destination at which to browse local wares and enjoy a coffee on the way.

 

  • Leadenhall Market

 

One of the oldest covered markets in London, Leadenhall Market dates back to the 14th century and is located in the historic center of the city’s financial district. The market is typically open weekdays from 10 am to 6 pm, and primarily sells fresh food and flowers. Independent butchers, cheesemongers, and florists manage stalls here, with a number of commercial retailers also located in the market. 

 

  • Broadgate Circle

 

Finally opened after an extended construction period, Broadgate Circle offers craft beer, botanical cocktails, cutting-edge workout spaces, and street food right next to Liverpool Street station. Great for grabbing a bite to eat from the Japanese, Spanish and Italian menus available, the Circle is also furnished with a stunning amphitheater and several upper-level walkways with views down on the space. Plus in winter, space is turned into a skating rink, becoming a veritable local wonderland.

 

  • One New Change

 

One New Change is a major office and retail development near Aldgate, consisting of 560,000 square feet of floor space (both offices and retail space), and is the primary shopping center in the City of London. Sixty shops and restaurants are located within the expansive mall, including a large number of high street retailers, which is open seven days a week, unusual for the City. Pay a visit to H&M or Topshop for clothing, or perhaps to Barbecoa, the unique barbecue restaurant, and butcher jointly run by Jamie Oliver and Adam Perry-Lang, for some truly succulent cuisine.

 

  • Boxpark Shoreditch

 

Shoreditch’s famous pop-up mall, Boxpark fuses together the concepts of modern street food and the pairing of local and global brands to create a unique shopping and dining destination. Entirely constructed out of refitted shipping containers, Boxpark boasts numerous bars, eateries, lifestyle and clothing stores within its units, and is a perfect embodiment of the enterprising Shoreditch hipster.

Food and Drink in Aldgate

Exploring the varied cuisine on offer is one of the many perks of visiting a new city. London’s Aldgate district is home to a variety of bars and restaurants that will showcase a great array of tastes and flavors with every mouthful. From modern British treats to continental and Oriental cuisine, the area really does deliver for all palates.

Here are our top 5 best places for food and drink in Aldgate:

 

  • Treves & Hyde

 

A restaurant and coffee bar, Treves & Hyde uses the freshest seasonal ingredients in all its servings, sourced from caring local farmers. Continental-inspired dishes are served in a modern setting with outdoor seating options, and there are breakfast, lunch, dinner and weekend brunch menus all available.

Address: 15/17 Leman St, Whitechapel, London, E1 8EN

 

  • The Ten Bells

 

A classic British pub serving beer, wine, and cocktails, The Ten Bells is also an essential stop on any Jack The Ripper walk due to its association with victims Annie Chapman and Mary Kelly. Inject a little notoriety into that gastropub vibe with an infamous history and drinks across three floors.

Address: 84 Commercial St, Spitalfields, London, E1 6LY

 

  • VQ Aldgate

 

This 60 cover restaurant and 30 cover bar offer a stylish and contemporary design from its ground floor location in the four-star Dorsett City Hotel. Service is available for 24-hour eating and drinking, and there’s also a large outdoor seating area for those sunny summer days.

Address: Ground Floor Dorsett City Hotel, Aldgate High St, London, EC3N 1AH

 

  • Satyrio

 

A stylish fine-dining Italian restaurant and wine boutique, all of Satyrio’s meals use only the best fresh ingredients from gourmet producers. Seasonal menus and a superb wine list made up of curated Old and New World Tastes complete the experience, and the restaurant also plays host to various art exhibitions, live music and wine tastings throughout the year.

Address: 49 Aldgate High St, London, EC3N 1AL

 

  • Brick Lane

 

Brick Lane is a famous street in the East End of London that runs from Spitalfields to Swanfield Street in Bethnal Green. Known for its many curry houses and street markets, Brick Lane is today the heart of the Bangladeshi community in London, and represents a history of successive communities of immigrants who settled into the area. Check out Aladin Indian Restaurant, Cinnamon Brick Lane and Eastern Eye Balti House for some of the best Indian food in the area.

Churches and Cathedrals in Aldgate

Despite the more secular societies in which many of us reside today, the stunning historic architecture of many old churches and cathedrals still attracts thousands of visitors every year. Exploring the places of worship around Aldgate is a great way of whiling away a few loose hours, and many of them can be easily viewed on many local walking tours of London.

For those interested in the architecture of religion, here are some of the most notable churches in the Aldgate area:

 

  • The Bevis Marks Synagogue

 

Officially known as Qahal Kadosh Sha'ar ha-Shamayim, the Bevis Marks Synagogue is the oldest synagogue in the UK in continuous use. First built in 1701, the synagogue is affiliated with the city’s historic Spanish and Portuguese Jewish community, and is a Grade I listed building.

 

  • St. Botolph’s

 

St. Botolph’s of Aldgate is an 18th century Church of England parish church constructed in a unique style: the current building features stone quoins and window casings with an obelisk spire. Undergoing several reconstructions over the years, the earliest records of a church on the site date back to 1115, though the foundations may date back to well before the Norman invasion of 1066.

Angel

Situated on the northern edge of Central London, Angel is approximately 3.2 km north-northeast of Charing Cross on the Inner Ring Road. Angel is an important retail and commercial centre. Angel sits next to ancient boundary of the communities of Islington and Clerkenwell. This later developed into the metropolitan boroughs of Islington and Finsbury.

The closest tube station is Angel Tube Station on the Northern Line of the London Underground. King’s Cross Tube station is also close by. It is a 15 minutes’ walk.

The nearby over ground stations are Caledonian Road &Barnsbury Overground Station and Canonbury Over ground Station.

Belgravia

Bordered by Buckingham Palace on the south east, Belgravia is situated in one of London’s most exclusive areas. Flanked by towering white washed Victorian town houses on either side, the streets of Belgravia are the playground of the rich and famous. Timeless architecture, stucco residences, and stunningly beautiful stone churches characterise Belgravia’s understated streets. Belgravia is fashionable London at its best.

Belgravia is in proximity to several tube stations including Sloane Square, Knightsbridge, Hyde Park Corner and Kensington. Belgrave Square, constructed in the 19th century during a regeneration of the area at the request of the 2nd Earl of Grosvenor, is the centre piece of the district and offers a verdant space to unwind.

Camden

The aroma of street food, the thumps from the stalls and a distinctive charm define the eccentric atmosphere of Camden. An inner city area of London, situated northwest of Charing Cross, Camden is an area that amazes all. Fashion, music, vintage shopping, crafts and arts fill up innumerable boutiques and stalls, making way to a new discovery every time you make a visit here. 

Camden boasts of an atmosphere that is unbeatable. Come over, listen to some great music and just be. Famous people like Dylan Thomas, Amy Winehouse and Walter Sicker made this wonderful neighbourhood their home. The closest station is Camden Town Tube Station and Chalk Farm station is around 15 minutes walk away. Also, there are various bus routes to go through this area.

Canary Wharf

Attractions

Canary Wharf is perfectly located to explore the city - with many iconic East London destinations within walking distance. However, it is not necessary to travel outside of the E14 area to find plenty of great attractions. Canary Wharf hides a surprising amount of diverse local amenities and attractions, along with the neighbouring areas, and many visitors are surprised to find there is so much to see and do. Below is a list of just five top attractions in Canary Wharf:

The O2 arena

A modern icon, the O2, with its distinctive domed arena, is a thriving leisure complex that offers everything from music concerts to historic exhibits. Tickets and prices vary for different events, so it is always advisable to check the website for the current programme. For the more adventurous, it is also possible to climb the dome itself, with tours available for as little as £36 for a single adult. 

Crossrail Place Rooftop Gardens

The Crossrail Place Roof Garden is a stunning oasis in the heart of London’s financial hub. Though something of a misnomer - the gardens are actually more or less on ground level - the stunning glass latticed roof and beautiful array of botanicals make this a fantastic, almost futuristic experience and offer a striking contrast against the surrounding skyscrapers. The garden is free to visit and open daily until 9pm. 

Watch a Sporting Event

Canary Wharf offers some of the best venues to watch sport anywhere in London. Not only is the complex the venue for the Canary Wharf Squash Classic tournament in March, as well as being on the route of the London Marathon and Vitality half marathon, but in the summer months, big screen televisions are set up in Canada Square Park. Here spectators can watch sporting events such as Ascot, Queen's, Wimbledon, the Tour de France and Formula 1 races, whilst enjoying a drink or two in the open air. 

Jubilee Park

Jubilee Park is a delightful green space with picturesque landscaping and plenty of floral arrangements and water features. Situated atop the Jubilee Underground Station, it offers a tranquil place for relaxation and also plays host to exhibits and live events throughout the year. Entry is free for all. 

Emirates Air Line

Just a short distance from Canary Wharf is the Emirates Air Line - London’s famous cable car line, which crosses the Thames from the Greenwich Peninsula to the Royal Victoria Dock, to the west of ExCeL London at an elevation of some 300ft - offering stunning views of the city. A standard single ticket is just £3.50, or £7 for a return. In addition, it is also possible to book the champagne experience for £28. The Emirates Airline runs from 0700-2330 Monday to Thursday, 0700-2300 on Fridays and Saturdays, and 0900-2230 on Sundays and bank holidays. 

Museums in Canary Wharf

Despite being known for its ultra-modern architecture and as being at the forefront of finance and commerce, Canary Wharf is also just a stone’s throw from several world-class museums and points of historical interest, each one offering an engaging and informative afternoon out and in some cases offering a glimpse into the historic role of the Thames as well as showcasing the technologies that have helped keep London safe from flooding and at the forefront of world trade throughout the centuries.

Museum of London Docklands

Part of the Museum of London, the Museum of London Docklands offers a fascinating insight into the areas operational history, including historic tug boats and river vessels, as well as an exhibit devoted to the history of the slave trade. The museum includes videos presented by Tony Robinson and houses a large collection of historical artefacts, models, and pictures over two floors. It is open 1000-1800 every day except some public holidays and entry is free.

The Cutty Sark

The Cutty Sark is the last surviving tea clipper in the world and upon its construction in 1869 was one of the fastest vessels on the ocean. Located just across the water in Greenwich, this award-winning attraction features live actors telling stories from the ship’s past, as well as cabins and decks restored to their original appearance. Tickets are priced at £15 per adult and £7.50 for kids, with further discounts available for pensioners and students. 

The Thames Barrier

Opened in 1982, the incredible feat of engineering that is the Thames Barrier was designed to prevent Greater London from being flooded by exceptionally high tides and storm surges moving up from the North Sea. It is able to open and close to control the flow of the river, thus protecting the floodplain. The structure is impressive in itself and also features a dedicated visitors’ centre. However, once a month there is a guided tour before visitors can watch the gates being tested. Dates and times for this can be found on the government website (https://www.gov.uk/guidance/the-thames-barrier).

The Ragged School Museum

A museum dedicated to one of London’s famous ‘ragged’ schools - which provided free education during the Victorian era. The museum features plenty of dressing up and interactive exhibits, as well as educational materials charting the work of patron Dr Barnardo and his mission to provide free education to London’s poorest during the 19th century. As such, it’s a great opportunity for kids and adults to experience life as a Victorian pupil. The museum is open 1000-1700 every Wednesday and Thursday, and between 1400 and 1700 on the first Sunday of each month. Entry is free. 

Landsbury Micro Museum

As the name suggests, The Lansbury Micro Museum is a small exhibition centre which offers different exhibits throughout the year. Part of the V&A, the museum often presents collections and exhibits of cultural and social significance, ranging from local history narratives to sub-cultural artworks. Open Fridays and Saturdays, 1200-1800.

Fun & Games in Canary Wharf

Canary Wharf is usually thought of as a major financial centre, known for its high rise buildings and fast-paced business culture. However, the complex isn’t all about work, work and more work. There are plenty of opportunities to unwind in the area - including leisure facilities offering a great mix of entertainment and activities. Below are the top five places for fun and games in Canary Wharf:

Mudchute Park and Farm

Mudchute Park and Farm is London’s largest city farm with over 32 acres of countryside in the middle of the Isle of Dogs and home to pigs, horses and ponies. There is also a pets' corner, with animal encounter sessions, making this a great attraction for families. The farm is open to visitors daily from 0900-1700 and is free to enter. Feed and grain for the animals can be purchased from the shop and there is also a delightful cafe on site. 

Escape London

Escape rooms have become hugely popular in recent years, offering a fun challenge for young and old alike. Canary Wharf is fortunate to have several within its vicinity, with Escape London being the most noteworthy, with themed rooms and multiple locations. Prices start at £66 for a two-person session, rising to £132 for a party of six. Open daily from 1000-2230. 

Delta Force Paintball

Anyone looking for some more adrenaline-fuelled fun will find Delta Force Paintball London is within easy reach of Canary Wharf - offering fast-paced action in specially designed scenarios, each offering different battle formats and missions. Prices start at around £14.99 for entry and kit hire, with paintballs priced at £9.99 per 100. It is also possible to book the venue for corporate events. 

Hollywood Bowling

Everybody loves bowling and there are two great locations very close to Canary Wharf - one within the O2 and one in Surrey Quays, both operating under the Hollywood Bowling brand. Prices start from £6.59 per game and centres are open 7 days a week. 

The Workhouse

The Workhouse is a popular leisure centre that offers a variety of sports and games - including five-aside football and gym facilities. The centre also has an exhibition centre and regularly holds community events, such as fundraisers and sporting challenges. 

Food, Wine & Nightlife

Given its prestigious reputation and central role in London’s commercial and financial industries, Canary Wharf features some fantastic night spots, including bars, pubs, wine bars and restaurants. Below are five of the most popular social hotspots in Canary Wharf:

The Merchant

A spacious oak-panelled pub with plenty of outdoor seating on its stylish terrace. Provides the traditional pub experience, with a great menu and huge array of guest ales. 

28 West Bar

Describing itself as ‘industrial-chic’, this refined waterfront establishment offers cocktails and canapes as well as a seasonal menu. This is an extremely popular venue, so those looking to eat are advised to book a table well in advance. 

Capeesh Sky Bar

Capeesh Sky Bar is a fashionable bar serving exquisite cocktails and a refined Italian menu. Boasting incredible panoramic views of the city, this 48th-floor venue boasts not only great views of the city, but also prides itself on its high-end range of spirits and liquors. 

Plateau

Another highly chic venue, Plateau offers contemporary French cuisine in a modern space with Saarinen tables and terraces overlooking the iconic Canada Square. Once again, booking in advance is strongly advised. 

Boisdale

Boisdale offers sophisticated Scottish cuisine - both traditional and modern - along with the chance to taste some of the world’s finest whiskeys. There’s also an oyster bar, cigar room and terrace. The Boisdale is hugely popular, especially at weekends when it regularly hosts live music. 

Walking tours in Canary Wharf

Perhaps the most surprising thing about Canary Wharf is its diverse selection of walking tours and operators. Visitors can choose to walk around some of London’s most impressive buildings, explore lush parklands or take in some contemporary artworks. Alternatively, it's also easy to mix all three without travelling far from the complex itself. Below are five popular routes and providers of walking tours in Canary Wharf:

Free Tours By Foot

Free Tours By Foot is a London-wide provider of fun, engaging and, more often than not, free walking tours. Effectively it is a platform for independent guides to offer everything from specialist history tours to bespoke sightseeing walks. The London Docklands tour includes the Canary Wharf complex and is held every Tuesday at 2pm. Alternatively, the company offers other tours all over the city, details of which can be found on the website (https://freetoursbyfoot.com/london-tours/).

London Top Sights Tours

Based on the Isle of Dogs, this tour operator offers a huge selection of walking tours, covering all of London’s major landmarks and including themed trips such as the famous Ripper walks - easily accessible from Canary Wharf - or a Harry Potter-themed tour for families. Tickets start at £15 for a basic tour and go up to around £70 for those that also include entry to landmarks. 

The Line Sculpture Trail

One of Canary Wharf’s hidden gems, the Line Sculpture trail is a free, self-guided walk stretching from North Greenwich to Stratford, between The Greenwich Peninsula (The O2) and the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. The trail is London’s first and only dedicated sculpture walk and features examples of contemporary and classic styles. Further works are expected to be added throughout 2019. 

Canary Wharf

Canary Wharf exhibits not only some of London’s most stunning architecture, but also has some intriguing topography, with its internal docks, the banks of the Thames and even some sprawling farmland. As such, a fantastic local walking tour can be started from Promenade Canary Wharf, with its stunning views of the river, before looping around the peninsular through Milwall and the Isle of Dogs, before returning to Canada Place.

Occupy London Walking Tours

Finally, for something a little more unusual Occupy London Tours are a volunteer-run organisation offering tours that teach visitors about the pitfalls of modern finance. Meeting at Canary Wharf tube station, the tour effectively tracks the 2007/8 financial crisis. The tour takes place in the evening; the exact time is revealed when you book your place.

Stay close to all of the amenities by staying at one of thesqua.re self catering apartments at Canary Wharf.

Chelsea

Designer shops, exciting punk boutiques, world-class restaurants, historical sites and a bohemian culture - this is what defines the very affluent Chelsea. Located along the iconic river Thames in central London, Chelsea is surrounded by Knightsbridge, Earls Court, Nine Elms, Kensington, Pimlico and Belgravia. Bands like The Rolling Stones and the Beatles have had an association with this place.

Chelsea is well connected by various modes of transportation. The closest tube stations are South Kensington (District, Circle and Piccadilly lines) and Sloane Square (District and Circle lines). Heathrow Airport can be reached in 60 minutes by tube. You can reach Gatwick Airport in 70 minutes by tube and train.

City of London

Attractions in the City of London

We all know that London is a city, but not many know about the City of London, the local government district and the primary CBD of London. Containing the likes of the London Stock Exchange and the Bank of England, the attractions in this district are pivotal to the UK’s economy but are also relevant to its history and modern character.

  • St Paul’s Cathedral 

One of the most recognisable attractions in London, this is one of the key sights in the whole city. Built-in 1675, the cathedral has held the memorial services of Winston Churchill, the Duke of Wellington, Admiral Nelson and Margaret Thatcher, as well as the wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer. The cathedral itself is also infamous for the “St Paul’s Survives” picture was taken during the Blitz in WWII, where it dominated the skyline above the smoke and fire.

While it costs £20 for entry for tourists on the door, it is free for worshipers.

  • Barbican Centre 

Music, theatre and film can be enjoyed here, with various events taking place throughout the week. From jazz festivals, art shows, Shakespeare, modern plays, new film releases, and exclusive highlights, there is so much to see and experience here every day, every week. Overall, this is an art lover’s dream as well as an essential cultural attraction in London.

While level G is free, along with a few other parts of the centre, films and performances will vary in cost based on what the visitor picks.

  • Bank of England 

Established in 1694, the Bank of England controls the monetary and fiscal policy of the UK. While this may seem dull, the exterior is more than worth adding to any selfie collection. But there’s also a museum where visitors can pick up a bar of gold, learn why people started to use paper money and why the bank notes are difficult to copy. 

The museum is free to enter, although it will be quite impossible for tourists to go anywhere else in the structure for obvious reasons.

  • The Gherkin 

180m high, this is one of the key buildings in the city and one of the city’s many examples of modern architecture. Getting a selfie will be difficult, but the exterior is more than worth getting a picture of due to its lavish style. But the real opulence is the restaurant inside. While it is undoubtedly expensive, the views are simply to die for. Imagine eating at the top of the Gherkin with stunning views of the city.

Walking in and around the building isn’t possible for travellers. Only the restaurant and private event spaces can be enjoyed. 

  • Leadenhall Market 

A covered market, many goods, and trinkets can be found here to brighten up any visit to the city. Just a short walk from the Walkie-talkie building, this old fashioned looking market has its own share of boutique items as well as a few bars and cafes for busy city workers and visitors to enjoy at their leisure. Independent stores and family-owned treats can be found throughout the streets ready to provide something amazing.

Guests and travellers should be aware that some of the fancier shops are going to cost more than average selections.

  • Temple Church 

Built by the Knights Templar as their headquarters, this is a great trip through history and especially the Crusades period. The church itself has strong links with the Magna Carta (with two of the preliminary charters issued by John I in here) as well as the USA (Five members of the Inner/Middle Temple signed the Declaration of Independence, seven the Constitution). Aside from its history, there is the unique interiors and exteriors that give it its character.

It’s £5 for entry (£3 for senior citizens and students), while those that want to say a prayer have free access.

  • Millennium Bridge 

Connecting the City of London with Bankside, this bridge was once nicknamed the “wobbly bridge” by Londoners after a few days of being opened. While the “movements” have since been taken care of, the bridge itself has stunning views of St Paul’s Cathedral which is in line with the bridge’s centre. This leads to an amazing photo at night with the lights all on.

  • The Monument 

Built to honour the dead and the devastation of the Great Fire of London in 1666, it is now a key selfie to have on any London visit. Climb to the top of the landmark and see more breathtaking views of London. Long before the huge skyscrapers and tall structures were erected in London, The Monument could be seen from all parts of the city. Those that don’t like heights are advised not to climb the structure and instead just to look up in awe.

Admission is £4.50 for adults, £2.30 for children, £3 for students and £3 for senior citizens. Joint tickets with the Tower Bridge Exhibition are also accepted.

Museums in the City of London

Everyone loves a good museum. The old and dusty beacons of knowledge are always a primary stop on any journey. While London itself is home to a vast variety of museums and art galleries, the amount varies from district to district. But the City of London district, while it doesn’t have as many museums as some, still has a few museums that are worth checking out.

  • Museum of London 

See the evolution of London throughout the centuries from ancient times right through to the 21st century. From the city’s pre-history, Roman invasion, the Black Death, the Civil Wars, the Great Fire of London and trading epicentre of the British Empire, the whole history is on display for curious visitors to explore and glean at their leisure. Also, temporary exhibitions broaden pivotal events that have shaped London’s place in Britain and the world, both in pop culture, technology and trade.

The museum is free to enter, but visitors are encouraged to donate.

  • Dr. Johnson’s House 

Samuel Johnson’s home grants a fascinating insight into the lexicon’s life. The 300-year-old townhouse is where he compiled his extensive Dictionary of the English Language, as well as other works. The collection includes items that are relevant to him and private collections of his numerous admirers. Looked upon as a hidden gem in the big city, this is certainly worth a visit during lazy afternoons or wet Sunday.

Tickets cost £7 for adults, £3.50 for children, £6 for students and £15 for families.

Food and Drink in the City of London

As one would expect, to eat in the City of London district is to experience some of the most extravagant and delicious foods. Why? Because this is where some of the biggest names in business hang out when they’re peckish, and they’re not going to just settle for something small and tasteless. Whether it’s at the top of the Gherkin or in a stylish diner down a busy street, there are plenty of options.

  • Angler

With mirrored ceilings and 7th-floor views, this is a prime location to enjoy Michelin-starred seafood that really hits the spot. Straight from the British seas, the fish is as divine and tasteful as one can imagine from locally sourced foods. Visitors will soon understand why it is a favourite of gastronomes, romantics and power lunchers alike. It’s best to book a table to avoid disappointment.

Address: 3 South Pl, Finsbury, London, EC2M 2AF

  • Bad Egg

Whether it’s a hearty weekend brunch or an all-day feast, this laid back yet sophisticated joint is fast becoming one of the go-to restaurants in London. Featuring a bottomless brunch (the first in London to do this), as well as other hits like the Korean Burger, Hanoi Ribwich, Turkey Hash and Vegan Chilaquils, any time of day and any day of the week is a special time to visiting this ultra-cool and ever-popular restaurant. 

Address: CityPoint, 1 Ropemaker St, London, EC2Y 9AW

  • Beany Green

Experience the rich and flavoursome foods of Australia in this inner-city oasis based in Broadgate Circle, close to Liverpool Street station. From its very own bottomless brunch to the open kitchen style and huge heated balcony, the restaurant is both popular with locals in the week and the weekend thanks to its cool Aussie vibe and dishes like the chargrilled harissa chicken breast, tandoori roasted salmon and award-winning banana bread sandwiches.

Address: 41 Broadgate, London, EC2M 2QS 

  • Blacklock City

Stacking some of the best sources of meat that the UK has to offer, this is a dream come true for those that love succulent rages of meat. Beef, lamb, pork - they’re all here in chop form! Before feasting, there’s a fine selection of starters to put visitors in the mood for what’s coming up, along with a dessert menu for “after chops”. Not to be missed, this may be a messier option, but some nights out are more than worth a bit of a mess.

Address: 13 Philpot Ln, London, EC3M 8AA

  • Bleecker

A great burger joint based in the Bloomberg Arcade, this is where a few of the city workers head out for a bite to eat at the end of a long day (sometimes in the middle of a hard day too). Whether it’s a double cheeseburger, blue burger, or a double bacon cheeseburger, the burger joint has all the usual favourites along with sides that include sweet potato fries, house fires, and angry fries. When the burgers are all taken care of, there’s nothing like washing it down an oreo milkshake or a square root beer.

Address: 16 Bloomberg Arcade, London, EC4N 8AR

  • Cabotte

This French venue offers exquisite food right from the heart of the Burgundy wine region. With both traditional and modern twists being served here every day, Londoners and travellers can harvest and indulge in hearty and scrumptious foods. Plus, visitors can wash it all down with a glass of wine.

Address: 48 Gresham St, London, EC2V 7AY

  • Café Sou

Specialising in coffee drinks, omelettes, baguettes, and rillettes, this a light treat for those that want to fill the gap, but leave space for something later. A fine addition for anyone wanting to explore foodie options in the centre of the city.

Address: 27 Poultry, London EC2R 8AJ

Shopping in the City of London

Even the most business-like and corporate of areas has a few shopping tricks up its sleeve. While they may not be huge shopping areas, they can often be boutique stores or even just a few luxury brands that are immensely popular with the big shots. The City of London has its own shopping areas and key stores that bring the corporate and business district to life.

  • One New Change 

A shopping centre comprising 60 stores, including restaurants and eateries, is a popular pick for those that right in the centre of the district. Some of the stores and famous brands here include All Saints, Calvin Klein, Dune, Gap, H&M, Hotel Chocolat, Hugo Boss, Nespresso, Pandora and many more. It would be wrong to miss this place off any shopping list in the City of London.

  • The Royal Exchange

This old fashioned structure houses plenty of boutiques and luxury brands, whilst also having a few fancy dining options too. Some of these luxury brands include the likes of Aspinal of London, Bamford Grooming Department, Boodles, Bremont, Crockett & Jones, Mulberry, Omega and Watches of Switzerland.

  • City of London Jewellers

Those that want a few expensive trinkets to take home with them will do best to shop here. From engravings to repairs and gold buying, there’s something for every jewellery lover to get out of the services. They are the only jeweller on the square miles that make and engrave, so it’s best for travellers that are staying in the area to choose this place over any other jewellery store.

  • Oliver Sweeny

Those that want gorgeous designer shoes and a variety of other clothing accessories can choose this retail chain for their indulgence. With immaculately styled clothing collections and so much more to be bought and admired, this is one of many great fashion and clothing chains in the city.

  • Hays Galleria

This mixed-use, Grade II building houses shops as well as restaurants, and of course fine views of the River Thames. Visitors that want to shop and eat in a glamourous, Victorian structure will be more than happy here, perusing the brands and fine foods that are on display, and a few art installations that are dotted about.

  • J.W Hooke

One many tailors in London, this is a family run business that has been open for 25 years. Providing quality bespoke garments for their range of customers, visitors can come here and get themselves fitted for the perfect suit or get alterations and repairs. Not too far from Bank station, this is more than convenient for those living in the city.

Covent Garden

Attractions

The very heart of London’s teeming West End. The difficulty in describing what to do and where to go is the multitude of things that will be invariably missed off of a list that’s never going to be complete! Here are five of the best attractions in Covent Garden and the surrounding area, for now… 

Somerset House 

Back in the day, there used to be quite a few grand palaces that lined the banks of the River Thames. Nowadays they are a little more few and far between. Dating from 1776, Somerset House is a pretty spectacular example of one that’s still standing. 

The house boasts a piazza which is its most famous feature. This open air space is a unique venue for open-air cinema screenings, concerts, and other events during the summer, as well as ice skating in the winter. 

Taking a tour inside the house is also possible year-round. A ticket must be booked but these are free. Some events will have a separate charge. 

Stanfords  

London is full of large bookshops so what makes Stanford’s worth a visit? It’s special for two reasons. One, it specialises completely in travel books. Two, it’s managed to do this for more than 160 years. 

It’s not been in the same location, it recently moved to its new location in Mercer Street from its famous old shop in Long Acre. It’s the ideal place from which the next great adventure can be planned. 

It is free to browse, with no entry fee needed for access. 

The Theatre Royal 

There are loads of theatres to visit, in and around Covent Garden, this is London’s famous West End after all. Everyone is showing a must-see play or musical so how can one be chosen? 

Amongst theatres, the Theatre Royal is special. It’s a location where the venue is as much of a must-see as the production itself. For a start, it’s been putting on a show for more than 350 years (at a number of different locations, granted.) 

It is also said to be one of the most haunted places in London so vigilance is recommended! 

Tickets need to be purchased for performances, and, naturally, the cost differs for each performance and where visitors want to sit. 

Covent Garden Market  

The real heart of Covent Garden. The 19th-century market hall is an attraction in itself with its unmistakable glass roof. The piazza that lays underneath is actually older, dating back to the 17th century. This makes it the oldest intentionally built market square in London. 

The shops are really an added bonus to the beauty of the place. There are lots of retailers you’d find on most High Streets, as well as market stalls selling those must-have souvenirs and trinkets. 

Entry to the market is free, but obviously all of the shops, restaurants, and cafes are not free. 

Royal Opera House  

As well as being home to London’s theatreland, Covent Garden is also the place to find the headquarters of the Royal Opera and the Royal Ballet, namely the Royal Opera House.  

This spectacular building dates back to 1858 and has seen some world-famous performances over the years. Including the debut of one Luciano Pavarotti.  

It still has a full calendar of performances throughout the year but booking in advance is normally essential. 

Museums in Covent Garden

London’s museum district is generally considered to be the Kensington area, but Covent Garden and the surrounding streets have lots to boast of in this particular area too.  

London Transport Museum  

Located right on the Covent Garden Piazza, this is one of the most popular museums in London for families. A favourite among kids but also plenty to enjoy for the adults too. 

It looks at tubes, trains, buses, and taxis and sees how they have changed and shaped people’s lives from the 1800s to the present day. 

There are plenty of examples of these modes of transport on display and the refreshing thing about this museum is the encouragement to interact with the exhibits.  

There’s also famous poster art used by the transport companies as well as an impressive archive of photos. 

Tickets cost £18 for adults but entry is free for children. 

National Portrait Gallery  

Directly opposite Covent Garden is the oldest art gallery in the world which is dedicated to portraits. The oldest pieces in the gallery date back to the 1500s and there are examples of works from every era, right up to the present day. It’s not all ancient unknowns either, there’s a portrait of David Beckham for a start! 

It’s not just paintings these days. There’s now a selection of media on display including sculpture, video, and photography. 

The gallery is free to enter but donations are encouraged. 

London Film Museum  

A relative newcomer in terms of London museums, this museum was founded in 2008 as the Movieum of London and moved to its current location in Covent Garden in 2012. 

The museum puts on long term exhibitions in which it shows props, costumes and other memorabilia from a particular set of films. Previous displays have included creatures from Ray Harryhausen films and a Charlie Chaplin exhibition which featured his original hat and cane. 

Since the beginning of 2014, the exhibition on the show has been ‘Bond in Motion’, which is the largest collection of vehicles from the James Bond series ever put together. 

Adults have to pay £14.50 for a ticket, whereas children only pay £9.50. 

Sir John Soane’s Museum  

In 1837, the neo-classical architect Sir John Soane died. He left his house and all of its contents to the general public on one condition, that it be left exactly as he had left it. 

This was the start of one of London’s most unique museums. 

Soane was an avid collector. He loved art, books, and antiques and the contents of the house makes that very clear. He even managed to secure pieces by Canaletto and Turner during his lifetime which are prominently displayed. 

The museum also plays host to a number of temporary exhibitions. Check before booking to see what’s on. 

The museum is free to enter but, like most museums in London, donations are encouraged. 

British Museum  

Quite simply the ‘daddy’ of all London museums, the one that simply has to be seen. And, as luck would have it, one of the world’s best museums is just a few minute's walk from Covent Garden. 

The museum is huge and it will literally take days to see it all considering it covers the last two million years of human history. Infamous treasures include the Elgin marbles and the hugely important Rosetta stone. 

The spectacular museum is free to enter, but it is best to donate as some of these wonders can’t be seen anywhere else. 

Churches in Covent Garden

As with most places in London, Covent Garden has its fair share of churches in and around the area. There are Presbyterian churches as well as French, Chinese and Danish churches. There’s even a London Underground church! 

St Paul’s Church 

Not to be confused with St Paul’s Cathedral, which is a much bigger church located near to the City of London (in an area helpfully called St Paul’s). 

St Paul’s Church is right in the heart of Covent Garden and is famous as the place where the Covent Garden street performers have their shows. 

In fact, this is very apt. As well as being the parish church of Covent Garden, St Paul’s is also known as the ‘Actor’s Church’ due to a long-standing connection with the theatre industry. 

St Martin-in-the-Fields  

Trafalgar Square is only a short walk away from Covent Garden and it is here where one of London’s most famous churches can be found. 

The present building dates from around 1726 but there has been a church on the spot since medieval times. 

The church is famous in modern times for its program to help the homeless people of London, an initiative started by a vicar at the church back in 1914. 

Since the multi-million pound refurbishment in 2006, the church’s crypt has also been well known for its jazz concerts which take place in the cafe area. 

Corpus Christi Church 

This is a Roman Catholic church located very near Covent Garden. It is a grade II listed gothic building which was opened by the then Archbishop of Westminster in 1874. 

It was originally dedicated to Corpus Christi in some attempt at an apology for the way in which the Catholic church was treated in the sixteenth century. 

The interior is much more modern than the interior of most churches and features a statue of St Genusius, the patron saint of actors, very much in keeping with the area in which the church stands. 

Notre Dame de France 

Most people would expect to be somewhere a little south of London if they were visiting a church with Notre Dame in the title. This French Catholic church, however, is located just north of Leicester Square. 

The church was established in the middle of the 19th century although the building in which it is located is actually a bit older. 

The idea of the church was a place where support could be given to the growing French population in the area at the time. 

Crown Court Church  

From a church people would expect to find in France to a church people would expect to find a little further north. 

The Crown Court Church is a Scottish Presbyterian church which has been established since James I (who was also James VI of Scotland). Later records suggest that the church has been in its present location since around 1711. 

One of the most fun aspects of this church is finding it, as just a doorway is visible. Look next to the Fortune Theatre which is opposite the Theatre Royal. 

Food & Drink

One thing is impossible in Covent Garden and that’s the avoidance of a good time. The place is teeming with all things entertainment, including theatres, shopping and of course, bars and restaurants. 

Fire & Stone  

Quite simply an unmissable treat for anybody who loves pizza, which is just about everybody, ever. 

This is gourmet pizza at its finest, with an unrivaled selection of international flavours on top of a classic Italian dish. Try the London (with sausage and bacon), the Acapulco (with chili and jalapeño) or the Madrid (with chorizo and prawns) amongst many others. 

The restaurant also has a fantastic new burger selection added to the menu too. 

Address: 31/32 Maiden Ln, Covent Garden, London WC2E 7JS 

Margot  

An Italian restaurant situated ideally for people who don’t want to venture too far outside of central Covent Garden. 

This is classic Italian cuisine which means the focus is on fresh ingredients that are currently in season across all of Italy’s regions. The restaurant is literally in the middle of theatreland so it is well versed in serving up a quick meal for those who have a performance to get to. 

The wine list isn’t bad either. It contains over 350 wines that come from across the world. 

Address: 45 Great Queen St, Covent Garden, London WC2B 5AA 

Grays & Feather  

A modern wine bar with homemade food. During the day, this place is renowned for its food alone, queues sometimes form down the street as office workers wait for something with the quality of a homemade meal, which most certainly isn’t fast food. 

The wine list is what makes space an all-day attraction. It covers all possible bases with sparkling English bottles from the south coast wine regions, Italian and South African classics, alongside more obscure tipples from places such as Japan and Brazil. 

Address: 26 Wellington St, Covent Garden, London WC2E 7DD 

Meatmarket  

A treat for carnivores with a pretty good view, of Covent Garden Market from its balcony setting. 

This is a meat dish specialist and is ideal for people looking for a quick bite before a show., although tables can’t be booked ahead. Remember, the queue is a sign of quality and it goes down quickly. This isn’t just fast food, it’s quality fast food. 

Address: Jubilee Market Hall, The Deck, Tavistock St, London WC2E 8BE 

Tuttons  

A beautiful restaurant laid out in a classic style with polished wooden furnishings and mirrors. It’s the polar opposite of Meatmarket but no less tasty. 

Tuttons has been a part of Covent Garden for over thirty years. It’s a favourite for pre-theatre meals but also a great place to people watch with a coffee or perhaps even a cheeky cocktail. 

Address: 11-12 Russell St, Covent Garden, London WC2B 5HZ 

Fitzrovia

Attractions in Fitzrovia

Surrounding the residential and old-fashioned areas, in all directions, are a legion of attractions all varied and exciting in their own measure. Naturally all travellers, when away from home, want to take part in experiences that are relaxing, fulfilling and memorable. Thankfully, Fitzrovia is full of attractions and things to do that will keep all visitors on their toes from the very start to the very end of their stay. A few of Fitzrovia’s attractions can be found below:

  • BT Tower

As famous and notable as the Shard, the Gherkin and the Walk-Talkie Building, the BT Tower is 190m high and was opened in 1965 as the Post Office Tower. While it has appeared in the likes of Doctor Who over the years and other programmes, the tower isn’t accessible to the general public but it can be enjoyed from the outside. Visitors will see many other tourists trying to get the perfect snap.

  • Fitzroy Square

One of a fair number of green spaces in the area, this Georgian square is the ideal place for guests to rest after enjoying other attractions or long walks around the British Museum. Visitors and guests will most likely see other travellers resting here or see a few of London’s many workers taking a short lunch break to get away from the office drama.

  • Bedford Square

While set in Bloomsbury, this is not too far from Fitzrovia and acts as another green spot to choose from when the need to relax, sit down and chill comes into effect. Guests can have a quick snack here or take in the views and have a quick wander around the square whenever they feel the need to. At the end of the day, long contemplative walks are good for the soul.

  • St Giles Casino

Those that want to test their luck have ample opportunity in Fitzrovia thanks to the St Giles Casino. Slots, blackjack, poker and all the other addictive and popular games are here to test the endurance and luck of anyone that is willing to go all in. Although, it is best for guests to play responsibly - no short or long trip needs the loss of a substantial fortune.

  • Alison Jacques Gallery

While there are many small galleries in London, one of the top ones is the Alison Jacques Gallery - always rated very highly by industry professionals. Various artists have been showcased here since its opening in 2004. These include Sheila Hicks, Roy Oxlade, Gordon Parks, Dan Fischer, Ana Mendieta, Dorthea Tanning and Michelle Stuart. It’s best for visitors to remember that some of the exhibitions do cost.

Museums in Fitzrovia

Some travellers want a bit of knowledge and culture to go alongside the attractions and who can blame them? At the end of the day, knowledge is power - or so they say. Museums always take up the things to do lists, crowding in hours of excitement and fascination. Fortunately, there are a fair few museums in and around Fitzrovia that deliver on all the fun and engagement that museums are renowned for.

  • British Museum

One of the best museums in the city, the British Museum holds over 8 million artefacts and takes up 75,000 m2. From Ancient Rome to the Age of Enlightenment to everything in between, beyond and further back in the web of time, this is an establishment that not many are going to want to leave. And given its size, it's quite impossible to see everything, let along take in everything in one trip.

The museum is free, but it is best for visitors to donate to show their appreciation for the marvel that the museum is. Also, the exhibitions throughout the year do cost. The only way for anyone to see these for free is to become a member.

  • Grant Museum of Zoology

Established in 1828, the Grant Museum of Zoology holds one of the oldest natural history collections in the UK. 68,000 zoological specimens can be found within, including quite rare ones like Dodo bones and a Rhamphorhynchus fossil. Despite its old and classical collection, entry to the museum is free. Perfect for any naturalist, young or old, professional, student or adventurer.

  • Pollock’s Toy Museum

This rather petit museum was first started in 1956 in an attic and has expanded to take up the smaller shop it now inhabits. The collection mainly focuses on Victorian toys, which is a treat for any collectors or enthusiasts. Suitable for all ages, tickets cost £7 per adult and £4 per child. There’s even on old clay mouse dating back to 2,000 BC (believe it or not).

  • Fitzroy House

While we’re not all followers of Scientology, Fitzroy House is an 18th century townhouse that showcases the life and works of the author and Scientology founder, L. Ron Hubbard. It may not be everybody’s cup of tea, but the author published 1,084 works in his lifetime - making him a three-time titleholder in the Guinness Book of World records. Admission is free into the museum.

  • The Cartoon Museum

Featuring a library of over 5,000 books and 4,000 comics relating to the subject of cartoons, this is really for enthusiasts only. Previous exhibitions have included Ronald Searle, Pont, Fougasse, Rowland Emett, The Beano and The Dandy, Mike Williams, Mel Calman, cartoons from private London clubs, Viz and more. While under 18s go free, adults must pay £8.50 for entry.

Shopping in Fitzrovia

With the likes of Tottenham Court Road right in its centre and Oxford Street not too far away, it’s safe to say that there are plenty of options to consider when London’s visitors decide to go shopping in Fitzrovia. From clothes shops to leather goods, big brands and small, any shopping adventure in Fitzrovia is made all the more unique and enthralling thanks to the monumental variety that’s on display.

  • Oxford Street

Out of all the many things to do in London, shopping on Oxford Street is always on the list. Why? Because it is one of the UK’s most popular places to shop, as can be attested by the constant crowds pummelling the place for deals and boutique goods. Some of the big brands on Oxford Street include Sports Direct, River Island, JD Sports, Clarks, Next, John Lewis, Hosue of Fraser, Debenhams, Marks and Spencers and many more. In short, hours can be spent here simply surfing the crowds, brands and offers.

  • Tottenham Court Road

With the added convenience of two London Underground stops (Goodge Street and Tottenham Cort Road), the road is both a splendid place to shop and is the ideal place to hop on the Underground to get to more destinations. Some of the stores that guests can enjoy include M&S, Heal’s, West Elm, Waterstones, Revival Retro, Muji, iSmash and many more that bring the modern street alive.

  • Goodge Place Market

Ope 11am-3pm from Monday to Friday, the Goodge Place Market may be of the smaller variety, but it still has enough juicy and scrumptious foods to make any day out in the city of London worthwhile. Burritos, falafel and kofte wraps are just some of the absolute street favourites that can be purchased from the market and be enjoyed from all those that need extra nourishment when they’re on their travels.

Food and Drink in Fitzrovia

When we travel to new locations, food and drink are of the highest priority. In fact, one of the top things to do in Fitzrovia and indeed London itself is to eat out and drink out. The Fitzrovia district is home to a variety of restaurants and places to drink that will take the day and night away with every bite and sip. From modern British treats to cuisines from afar, the area does really deliver for all palates.

  • Honey & Co

Run by a husband and wife duo, this tiny restaurant delivers scorching delights from the Middle East. With seasonal menus, breakfast menus and dessert menus, any season and any time of day are ideal for a quick bite or meal here. Here are a few things all should try; roasted lamb & freekeh salad with cherries, tarragon & sour cherry tkemali sauce; house-cured Cornish mackerel with saffron potatoes, capers, harissa & soft boiled egg; and slow-cooked spiced lamb shoulder, burnt pitta, pomegranate & amba.

Address: 25 Warren St, Fitzrovia, London W1T 5LZ

  • Clipstone

Flavour is essential at this Fitzrovia restaurant. With a menu that is full to the brim with innovative ideas and dishes, an evening here is the right way to end a day of adventure. Visitors can buy two courses for £22 or three courses for £26 when they come here at lunchtime though - perfect. Some of the dishes to munch on include ravioli of lemon verbena, fennel & ricotta, courgettes, dill & pine nuts; cornish hake, cauliflower, leeks, chard & yuzu butter; and chocolate mousse & cherry ice cream.

Address: 5 Clipstone St, Fitzrovia, London W1W 6BB

  • Picture Fitzrovia

Opposite the BBC broadcasting house, this is a prime place to sit down and feast on some spellbinding and lush dishes that will fill the heart, stomach and soul. Guests can sit down and enjoy things like crisp pressed pork, apricot turnip remoulade, pickled mushroom; smoked haddock brandade, crisp poached egg, hispi, brown shrimps; and slow-cooked Welsh lamb, sweetbread, fennel, white beans, salsa verde.

Address: 110 Great Portland St, Fitzrovia, London W1W 6PQ

  • Barrica Tapas Bar

Sometimes little bites are better than huge meals that make us all burst. Born out of many trips to Spain, this tapas bar provides small tasty treats that have enough flavour to make any long or short trip come alive. From the paté de tupinambo y avellanas, patatas bravas, croquetas de jamón y oloroso and the bacalao confitado, there are enough small plates to enjoy true Spanish cuisine.

Address: 62 Goodge St, Fitzrovia, London W1T 4NE

  • Noize

Those that want a little taste of France in London will be right at home here. Run by the former manager of the Pied à Terre restaurant, Mathieu Germond, French foodie delights and wines are the specialities here. Some of the notable dishes include homemade pappardelle, crushed broccoli, mousseron; suckling pork belly, pomme puree, Tokyo turnip, roasted apple; and Spring lamb rump, gnocchi, tongue, basil and cep tart.

Address: 39 Whitfield St, Bloomsbury, London W1T 2SF

  • ROKA Charlotte Street

This restaurant serves contemporary Japanese robatayaki cuisine in a striking yet informal surrounding in the heart of London’s media district. Dominated by the centrally located robata grill, fish, poultry, meat and vegetables are prepared in full view so diners can have a more intimate and sociable experience.

Address: 37 Charlotte St, Fitzrovia, London W1T 1RR

  • Mac and Wild Fitzrovia

For a Scottish experience in London, this is the best bet. With wild Scottish meat, game and seafood to try and taste here, along with over 120 whiskies and a great selection of Scottish craft beers, gins and a range of Scottish cocktails, this really is a rarity that has to be enjoyed. Regardless of when a visitor turns up, they can feast on the best that Scotland has to offer.

Address: 65 Great Titchfield St, Fitzrovia, London W1W 7PS

  • Mere

Located in the heart of Fitzrovia, Mere is an elegant and contemporary restaurant, offering a relaxed yet refined dining experience with dishes that celebrate the passion and heritage of the owners by blending classical French with South Pacific influences. There’s a downstairs restaurant that has a warm and inviting atmosphere with soft lighting, while the upstairs bar is more than ideal for a pre or post-dinner hang out.

Address: 74 Charlotte St, Bloomsbury, London W1T 4QH

Hackney

Located in north-east London, Hackney Borough is surrounded by Haringey to the north, Newham to the east, Waltham Forest to the north-east, Tower Hamlets to the south-east and the City of London to the south-west. Hackney is also known as the hipster central. It is a multicultural area which has undergone a revival in the past. Today Hackney is extremely fashionable with a flourishing art scene. The area is home to stylists, writers, florists, pop stars and artists.

The place houses great cafes, independent bars, gastropubs, restaurants, markets and fashionable and vintage shops. Hackney also has an interesting nightlife scene with several special interest evenings taking place in the area.

Hackney isn’t served very well by London underground services. The nearby stations are Liverpool street and Old Street but there are however three London Overground lines serving Hackney. These are the North London Line, East London Line and Lea Valley Lines.

Hammersmith

Situated in West London, Hammersmith is a well-established entertainment hub famed for its theatres that attract performers and visitors from across the globe. Hammersmith is bordered by Kensington to the east, Shepherds Bush to the north, Chiswick to the west and Fulham to the south.

Evidence of occupation in the Hammersmith stretches back as far as the Anglo Saxon period due to its proximity to the River Thames. Originally a small fishing town, Hammersmith has transformed into popular riverside suburb.

One of London’s most multicultural areas, Hammersmith is a conglomerate of diversity-which is reflected in the cuisine. As one of the major transport hubs in West London, Hammersmith is well connected-with two underground stations, an Overground line and regular busses connecting the district to central London.

Heathrow

An international hub for the city’s business travelers, as well as the third-largest airport in the world for passenger traffic, Heathrow is a destination that much first time or returning visitors to London will frequently find themselves near. Well-connected to the rest of London via the Underground and Heathrow Express, there are plenty of hotels and serviced apartments to be found in the local area, as well as a number of attractions to keep visitors entertained during a lengthy stopover.

Here Are The Top 5 Attractions Near Heathrow We Would Recommend To Any Traveler:

  • Chiswick House

Situated in one of West London’s most scenic public gardens, Chiswick House is perhaps the finest example of Neo-Palladian architecture in the city. The house and gardens were designed by Lord Burlington and completed in 1792, and currently occupies an area of some 65.1 acres. While the house is a historic sight in itself, the surrounding gardens are also some of the earliest examples of British landscape gardening and are well worth a visit on their own.

  • Richmond Park

Slightly less far to travel than London itself, the bustling suburb of Richmond upon the Thames always warrants thorough exploration simply due to its scenic green spaces. Richmond Park is the most famous of these; stretching over 2,500 acres, it qualifies as London’s largest Royal Park, and features everything from free-roaming deer and ornate bridges, to landscaped shrubbery and exotic plants and flowers.

  • Thorpe Park

Along with Legoland Windsor and Chessington World of Adventures, Thorpe Park is one of the many popular theme parks in the area surrounding Heathrow. Situated between Staines and Chertsey, Thorpe Park is home to a number of thrill rides, rollercoasters, and arcade games, with overnight accommodation also available. Some of its rides are nationally renown: Tidal Wave, Colossus, Nemesis Inferno, Stealth, The Swarm and Saw are a must for all those white-knuckle fans, but the park also contains a number of rides for younger children. A fun day out for the whole family.

  • Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

Home to the world’s largest collection of living plants, the beautiful Kew Gardens came into existence in 1840, and over the last 150 years has become a haven for rare and exotic species of plant. While its accompanying library contains more than 750,000 horticultural volumes, the gardens themselves contain more than 30,000 different kinds of plants and have been on the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites since 2003.

  • Ascot Racecourse

Don that top hat and tails or posh frock and get ready for a day at the races! Ascot is possibly the most famous flat racecourse in the UK and the venue for a number of the leading meetings each year. Located just outside the town of Windsor, horses have raced on Ascot’s grounds since 1711, and the reigning monarch and royal family members are frequently in attendance whenever an event is running. In particular, the Ascot Gold Cup, King George VI, and Queen Elizabeth Stakes draw in talented horses and jockeys from across the globe, and the turnout is always excellent.

Museums Near Heathrow

Whether in Heathrow for a brief stopover or for an extended stay in London, one of the best ways of spending an idle afternoon is to explore the history and culture of the city in one of its many museums. With Central London just a short tube journey away on the Piccadilly Line, many of the city’s top museums are within easy reach. But for those looking for something a little closer to home, there are plenty of excellent exhibitions off the beaten track for visitors to enjoy.

Here is a list of our top 5 museums near Heathrow:

  • Musical Museum

Located just a few miles from the airport, the Musical Museum in Brentford contains one of the most renowned collections of self-playing musical instruments in the world. Not only does this venue house rare working examples of player pianos, orchestrions, and violin players, but there is also a 230-capacity concert hall and in-house cinema, both of which are used for performances throughout the year. Admission is £11 for adults and £9 for children.

  • London Motor Museum

A must for auto enthusiasts, the London Motor Museum in Hayes boasts over 160 exhibits, including classic cars from the 1960s, 70s, and 80s. Among them are several iconic vehicles from pop cultures, such as the Batmobile (1989), Herbie the Volkswagen Beetle, and a Ford Gran Torino from the TV series ‘Starsky and Hutch’. The entry costs £30 for adults and £20 for children but it is well worth the price.

  • World Rugby Museum

The World Rugby Museum reopened in February 2018 in the South Stand of Twickenham Stadium, the home of English rugby, with a current collection comprising over 37,000 pieces of rugby memorabilia, from boots to balls, jerseys and more. Many temporary and permanent exhibitions can be found here, and the museum is also a great complement to the World Rugby Hall of Fame, located in the town of Rugby itself. Admission costs £25 for adults and £15 for children.

  • Ham House

A Grade I listed a property, Ham House is a truly remarkable historic building. Completed in 1610, it stands amid the beautiful scenery of Grade II listed parks and gardens in the London borough of Richmond upon the Thames. Visitors can enjoy the gardens at their leisure, before exploring the numerous pieces of period furniture and artwork in the house itself. Entry to the house costs £11 for adults and £5 for children, a bargain for those antique enthusiasts.  

  • Marble Hill House

The home of Henrietta Howard, Countess of Suffolk, Marble Hill House is an 18th-century Palladian villa chock full of early Georgian furniture, paintings, and gilded decorations. With past residents also including Jonathan Swift and Alexander Pope, the manor is steeped in history, and the grounds of which it is a part also contain many leisure facilities, such as tennis courts, cricket pitches and a children’s play area. The site is now owned and preserved by English Heritage, and admission is free.

Shopping Near Heathrow

Aside from the brand boutiques and duty-free shopping opportunities of Heathrow Airport itself, there are plenty of shopping opportunities in the wider area for visitors to really sink their teeth into. An afternoon browsing the various local wares or stocking up for the next city break is a great way of passing the time, so here are the best places to shop around Heathrow we would recommend:

  • Elmsleigh Shopping Centre

Located in the nearby Staines-Upon-Thames, Elmsleigh Shopping Centre is the main shopping destination in town. A modern mall featuring mainstream fashion stores, phone retailers, bookshops and cafes, visitors are bound to find what they are looking for on its many shelves, and can easily kill some time browsing for extras as well.

  • Heathrow Boutique

Heathrow Airport offers much to see and buy on any given day. Filled with countless high street stores, the airport also boasts several designer outlets thanks to its sheer size, among them Hugo Boss, Giorgio Armani, Burberry, Hollister and Tommy Hilfiger.

  • Knightsbridge

A short journey on the Underground will take visitors into Central London, with its plentiful shopping opportunities. One of the most exclusive shopping districts is Knightsbridge, home to a number of designer boutiques, not to mention Harrod’s, the world’s most famous retail emporium. Featuring everything from antique to vintage clothes, Harrods is synonymous with luxury shopping and is the ideal place for some retail therapy. And for children, the world-renowned Hamley’s toy store is just around the corner, boasting over 35,000 toys and games across seven floors.

  • Windsor

For high street shopping with a touch of history thrown into the mix, look no further than Windsor and Eton, on the banks of the River Thames. Not only does this famous town offer a number of high street stores, including Marks and Spencer and Superdrug, but the town is also the home of Windsor Castle, one of the many current residences of the Queen of England.

Food and Drink Near Heathrow

Experiencing the vast variety of new food and drink on offer is one of the many perks of travel. As London is such a diverse city, there will naturally be many menu options for visitors to enjoy, from traditional pub classics like fish and chips to more exotic cuisine like curry, tapas, and sushi. There are a number of excellent restaurants within Heathrow that cater to all customers’ tastes. Here are a few of our favorites:

  • Carluccio’s

A popular chain restaurant, Carluccio’s greets visitors with the enticing sights and smells of their famous baked meringues and pastries, while also offering a selection of Italian favorites, including pizza and pasta.

  • Caviar House & Prunier

A producer of the world’s finest Balik smoked salmon and aforementioned Prunier caviar, this quality restaurant is recognized as one of the market leaders worldwide for its serving selection.

  • Bridge Bar & Lounge

A traditional British pub with a welcoming atmosphere, the Bridge Bar & Lounge serves classic fare such as fish and chips, pie and mash, and roast dinners, all with a great selection of beers on tap. A group favorite.

  • Steak & Lobster

Another popular chain restaurant, Steak & Lobster is renowned for serving the two dishes that make up its name. But their fine selection is not just limited to meat; they also serve some great seasonal salads, as well as a range of excellent desserts.

  • Madhu’s

Madhu is a staple of the local area. A long-standing Indian restaurant, Madhu’s falls well under the fine dining category with its sumptuous selection of spiced curries, and also caters for weddings, private parties, and corporate events.

  • Bombay Wok

A blend of fusion cuisine, Bombay Wok takes classic Indian food and cooks it in a Chinese fashion. Delicious and Oriental.

Hoxton

An area in East London, Hoxton is situated north of the City of London and is bordered by Wharf Road and City Road to the west, Regent’s Canal on the north,Kingsland Road to the east and Old Street to the south.

Currently one of the trendiest places in London, Hoxton is a mecca for trendy bars, art galleries, interesting cuts and styles. It, by all means, represents the extravagance of the avant-garde. One can find impressive and witty art works and graffiti on the walls.

How to get there?

Hoxton is a National Rail Station on the East London Line of the London Overground network. Old Street on the Northern line is the closest London Underground Station and is to the southwest of the area.

Hyde Park

One of the Royal Parks of London, Hyde Park is one of the largest city parks in the world. Covering 350 acres of land, the park has more than 4000 trees, a meadow, a large lake and beautiful flower gardens. Once in the park, it’s obvious for you to forget you are right in the heart of the busy and bustling London.

What draws everyone to Hyde Park is that it has something for all. You can enjoy everything from boating, skating, cycling and swimming to horse riding and tennis. Hyde Park also houses buildings like the Joy of Life fountain, The Serpentine Bridge and the famous Achilles statue. The two lakeside restaurants serve everything from a cup of coffee to an elaborate three-course meal. You can also go to Speaker’s Corner to listen to what some of the famous orators have to say.

Some of the areas close to Hyde Park include South Kensington, Knightsbridge and Piccadilly and the large park covers several tube stations in its different corners. Jump on the tube at Hyde Park Corner stationfor you a hassle-free way of travelling with easy access to the rest of the city.

Islington

Mainly a residential district of Inner London, Islington is a district in Greater London and is part of the London Borough of Islington. It stretches from Islington High Street to Highbury Fields and includes the area around Upper Street and Southgate Road.

The neighbourhood combines the chic Georgian squares with some simple parts. Islington has a flourishing theatre scene and exciting nightlife. The area is home to Arsenal, the biggest football club of London.

Places close to Islington include Angel, Canonbury, Hoxton, Holloway, King’s Cross, St Luke’s and Finsbury to name a few.

Islington is well served by various bus routes. The major bus interchange is located near Angel tube station.

The nearby stations are Angel tube station, Essex Road train station, King’s Cross, Highbury & Islington station and St Pancras International.

Kensington

Attractions in Kensington

With Kensington being one of the most affluent and upscale areas of London, it’s not hard for visitors to imagine an area full of wealth and opulence. While they’re almost certainly right, there’s also wealth and a plethora of attractions in the neighbourhood that complement its rich reputation. While some may be obvious (Kensington Palace to name one of them), there are some that may not be so well known. 

  • Kensington Palace 

One of the Royal Palaces of the British Royal Family since William III and Mary II in the late 17th century, Kensington Palace has also been the home of the young Queen Victoria, Princess Diana, and now the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge. Explore the grand and opulent King’s State Apartments (each one more lavish than the previous), discover more about the inhabitants of the palace and have beautiful walks around the gardens. As well as taking a pic of the Queen Victoria statue. Out of all the things to do in Kensington, this is one of the key attractions that aren’t to be missed.

Ticket prices are £17.50 for adults and £8.70 for children, whilst members go free.

  • Royal Albert Hall 

Opened by Queen Victoria in 1871, and named after her late husband, Prince Albert, the Royal Albert Hall holds a special place in the heart of British culture. Notable for being the home of the Proms, a few BAFTA Award ceremonies, as well as selective film premieres and band performances, this is one of the key highlights in the area. From its fluted aluminum roof and bright diffuser discs to the pomp of the 19th century that still exudes from its structure, no visitor can miss the chance to see an event in here or to have a guided tour. 

Tickets for events can vary in price, with the guided tours also varying in price thanks to group rates.

  • Harrods 

Located on Brompton Road in Knightsbridge, Harrods is the largest department store in Europe and is forever crowded with tourists and Londoners that want something unique, luxurious and splashy. Some of the products on offer include clothing for women, men, children and infants, electronics, jewelry, bridal trousseau, toys, food and drink, packaged gifts, stationery, housewares, furniture, and much more. If there’s a top spot to shop in London, then it’s at Harrods.

Be aware that prices are going to be a bit steep as the Harrods label costs more than the items in there.

  • Kensington Square Park

One of the oldest park squares in Kensington, this homely green space is lovely for a calm walk in the morning, afternoon or evening. Take a seat and just watch the crazy city and its hectic nature flies by from dusk till dawn. Naturally, the park is free to enter and relaxing isn’t chargeable at all.

Museums in Kensington

Knowledge, dust, crowds, gift shops - these are just some of the things that spring to mind when we think of museums. Not just for rainy days or a way of trying to entertain impatient children, museums are a way to really connect to the past and all its advances in technology and human intuition. Out of all the things to do in Kensington, exploring the museums are a must.

  • The Natural History Museum 

Featuring 80 million items within five main collections (botany, entomology, mineralogy, paleontology, and zoology), the Natural History Museum is a pinnacle of learning and knowledge in the heart of London. From its dinosaur bones, human evolution exhibits, a collection of rocks, hordes of animals specimens and more, this museum is a great adventure into the wonder that is planet Earth. There’s also a cafe here for those that need to nourish their appetites as well as their minds.

While the museum is free to enter, it is recommended to donate £5 to the museum.

  • The Science Museum 

Founded in 1857, visitors can charter the Industrial Revolution right through to the Space Age, the rise of the internet and the prominence of AI. James Watt, Matthew Boulton, Isaac Newton, Marie Curie, and Alan Turning are just some of the prominent scientists in history whose work can be indulged and respected throughout the exhibits and special events. Visitors can check out the old engines, space equipment, old cars and so much more.

The museum is free to enter but it is best to donate a couple of pounds as the exhibits are really out of this world.

  • Leighton House Museum

One of the most remarkable buildings of the 19th century, Leighton House (home to the artist Lord Frederic Leighton) is the only purpose-built studio-house open to the public in the UK. With lavish decor and opulent furnishings, looking around this place will really open up the eyes of visitors to how “the other half lived”. Plus it has hordes of art and other hidden treasure to entertain those that want to see something different and special.

Tickets are £9 per adult, £7 for senior citizens (and other concessions) and are free for Art Fund Members, under 18s, Friends of Leighton House and ICOM Members.

  • Design Museum

Experience the wonders and grandeur of the creative mind when you put aside a few hours for this cool museum. Explore the history of contemporary design, take in a few lectures, talks, courses and workshops or some of the events that are aimed at young people and families that are interested in the weird and wacky world of design.

There is free entry to the museum but some of the temporary exhibits might cost.

  • 18 Stafford Terrace

Another opulent surrounding, 18 Stafford Terrace was the home of Punch cartoonist Edward Linley Sambourne, his wife, their two children, and their servants. With an “aesthetic interior”, decorated in the “House Beautiful” style, using foreign or 'exotic' influences in the decoration of the home - which can be seen by the various Japanese, Middle-Eastern and Chinese objects throughout the home. A real treat for those that love the past as well as dynamic and lavish interiors, 18 Stafford Terrace is a rare trip back in time.

To gain access, tickets are £9 per adult, £7 for senior citizens (and other concessions) and are free for Art Fund Members, under 18s, Friends of Leighton House and ICOM Members. Be aware that tickets for tour guides, costumed guides and half-term pricing does vary.

Food and Drink in Kensington

Much like any part of London, Kensington is host to a variety of restaurants and eateries that constantly deliver the 

  • Launceston Place 

One of Kensington’s hidden gems, Launceston Place serves a flamboyant, delicate and seasonally-inspired European menu. Whether guests choose the a la carte menu, one of its tasting menus or the Saturday and Sunday menus, a whirlwind of flavours are set to make every lunch or evening meal come alive. Anyone thinking of dining here would do best to make a reservation.

Address: 1A Launceston Pl, Kensington, London W8 5RL

  • Kitchen W8 

A Michelin-starred restaurant, it crafts modern English food with a French soul - an intriguing combination that has kept the restaurant in the top 10 favourites with locals and workers in the Kensington area. With both a set and tasting menu, customers can have full choice and ownership over what appears on their plate and how adventurous they want to be when they arrive.

Address: 11-13 Abingdon Rd, Kensington, London W8 6AH

  • Elystan Street 

Time for guests to bask in more European foods when they choose to quell their appetite at this handsome restaurant. Their a la carte and set menus all deliver succulent flavours and tasteful delights, like sea bass, octopus, fowl bolognese, duck and so much more. Anyone can find something here that will create a whole new dining experience that will be more than memorable.

Address: 43 Elystan St, Chelsea, London SW3 3NT

  • Balans 

For scrumptious food that will leave any belly full to the brim, surely Balans in Kensington is a top pick? With the likes of the delicious Balans burger, crispy pork belly, roasted scallops and Thai red curry, there is much to be had on the menu for every type of palette. And then, of course, there’s the cocktails like the Porn Star Martini or the Classic Irish Modernist to be had at the cocktail bar, suitable as a starter to prepare for the evening or at the end to swill it all down.

Address: 187 Kensington High St, Kensington, London W8 6SH

  • Brunch Muriel’s Kitchen

Serving up its own version of British Charm, this lively London bistro is ideal for breakfasts, family lunches, catch-ups for old friends, romantic nights out and even a solitary and quiet bites. Whether guests just want a quick nibble of something or a cup of tea.coffee, the friendly and ambient atmosphere makes it an ideal pick.

Address: 1-3 Pelham St, Kensington, London SW7 2ND

  • The Ledbury 

With two Michelin stars, this restaurant is arguably one of the key places to eat on any visit to Kensington. From the likes of lobster, pork, meringue, roast cod, black figs, and many other varieties, all guests and happy eaters can find much to indulge their senses in. Due to its intense popularity, it is best to book a table to be on the safe side.

Address: 127 Ledbury Rd, Notting Hill, London W11 2AQ

Shopping in Kensington

Every traveller loves to shop until they drop; it’s one of the perks of travelling after all. And this can more than be done in the likes of London’s Kensington. With a catalog of shops, markets, and boutique stores, Kensington can really provide for guests and travellers that want something a little more sophisticated and precious as opposed to gifts that are more mundane and broad. Sparkly trinkets and many other lavish pieces are awaiting new homes here, so guests should charge on around before they miss the ideal pick.

  • Portobello Road Market 

One of the world’s largest antique markets, Portobello Road Market is really 7 markets in 1. With the likes of second-hand goods being sold, along with antiques, food, clothes, fruit & veg, and so much more, this long street will be one of the key places for guests to shop throughout their short or long trip in Kensington.  

  • South Kensington Books 

This book store may well be a tight squeeze for crowds but it is more than worthy to stand beside the rest of the bookshops that have stood in the same spot since the 1940s. With modern classics mixed in with the “real” classics, and with all the books of history and science interwoven with philosophy, technology, and art, this is a book worm’s treasure chest. 

  • Harrods 

Situated on Brompton Road in Knightsbridge, Harrods is the largest department store in Europe and is always over-crowded with tourists and busy Londoners that want something that signifies status and luxury. A few of the products on offer include clothing for women, men, children and infants, electronics, jewelry, bridal trousseau, toys, food and drink, packaged gifts, stationery, housewares, furniture, and much more. If there’s a top spot to shop in London, then, surely, it’s at Harrods.

  • L.K.Bennett 

A luxury fashion brand, this is where a few of the upscale shoppers go to choose their new style for the season. Travellers can have a deep dive into the best of London fashion as well as a few little trinkets that add an extra splash to the glitz and glamour.

  • Harvey Nichols 

While it may be a chain, the flagship store is here in Knightsbridge in all its glamour. With all the usual beauty and fashion goods spread throughout the store, shoppers can really enjoy themselves in one of the key fashion chains. Shopping for luxury brands has never been so enjoyable. 

  • Whole Foods 

They may be all over America, and they’re all over London too. With all the American grub (but probably not the portions), this is another way to experience the US of A without the extortionate plane ticket. Healthy foods abound here as does the American touch. Great for breakfast and dinner shops, or even just for a few light snacks, missing this great brand off the shopping list would be sinful.

knightsbridge

Knightsbridge is a part of London famed for luxury and excess. It’s filled with swanky hotels, bars, restaurants, clubs and attractions, and the rich and famous can often be seen patrolling the streets. 

It’s also a part of London popular with tourists because of all the things to see and do there. Here are five reasons to split off from the hoi polloi and rub shoulders with the privileged, even if it’s just for a few hours.    

  • Hyde Park  

Arguably London’s best known Royal Park. Not because at 350 acres it’s one of the largest, or because it was originally designated a park by Henry VIII as he wanted a place to hunt. It’s probably because there is just so much going on all year round. 

In summer it turns into the place to be for concert goers, with the biggest names in music performing all summer long. In winter it turns into the Winter Wonderland, London’s biggest and most popular Christmas attraction. 

The rest of the year people have to make themselves content with jogging, boating, tennis, horse riding, cycling or swimming. Or whatever else takes their fancy. 

Entry is free for all. 

  • Kensington Palace  

The home of choice for many of the UK’s young royals since it came into the possession of the Royal Family in the 17th century. It’s hard to believe it was once a two storey mansion built as a country house. 

Indeed, the first Royal occupants, William II and Mary II used it as a country retreat. 

Britain’s second longest serving monarch, Queen Victoria was born there, lived there for most of her childhood before leaving for Buckingham Palace. 

In more modern times it has been the home of Diana, Princess of Wales and Princess Margaret. 

Today it is the official residence of the heir to the throne Prince William, his brother Prince Harry and their families. Or officially, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and the Duke and Duchess of Sussex. 

Tickets cost £17.50 for adults and £8.70 for children. 

  • Kensington Gardens  

These magnificent grounds were once considered part of Hyde Park and were also part of the private gardens of Kensington Palace, above. 

Today, however, this beautiful open space to the west of Hyde Park is an official Royal Park in its own right and covers an impressive 270 acres. It links together with Hyde Park, St James’s Park and Green Park to form a continuous green open space in the capital. 

As well as Kensington Palace, other things to see within the park include the Albert Memorial and the Diana Memorial Playground. 

Entry is free for the gorgeous gardens. 

  • Buckingham Palace  

Nestled around the Royal Parks and palaces is a residence that needs very little introduction, the official residence of the British Royal Family since 1837. Not only the official residence, but also the administrative centre of Royalty in the country. 

There are 775 rooms in the palace, including 240 bedrooms and 78 bathrooms. Whilst a tour obviously doesn’t wander round the Queen’s private bedroom and bathroom, it does include some of the 19 state rooms in the palace, amongst many other areas. 

Tickets are £26.50 for adults, £14.50 for children and £67.50 for children. 

  • Royal Albert Hall 

A legendary concert hall and one of the most distinctive and recognisable buildings in London. 

It was opened in 1871 by Queen Victoria and since then has played host to some of the most famous performance artists of every generation. Th type of performances include ballet, opera, circus performances, films and of course music concerts.  

It also plays host to other events throughout the year, including those associated with sports and award ceremonies. 

Ticket prices vary for each performance. 

Museums in Knightsbridge 

Knightsbridge is famed for its museums which is probably the reason why it is known as London’s ‘Museum Quarter’. It’s a title well deserved, three of the most famous and most visited museums in the capital are located here, as well as a few smaller, lesser known ones too. 

London museums can be a cheap day out, many of the biggest ones are free to enter (though a donation is expected). 

  • Natural History Museum  

One of the most important institutes in the world in terms of the study of natural history. As a museum it is awe inspiring, even from the outside as it is housed in one of the most impressive buildings to be found anywhere in London.  

From the huge blue whale skeleton to the dinosaur remains (just two out of 80 million specimens the museum houses), this is a great day out for all the family. 

Entry is free although donations are encouraged. 

  • Science Museum  

The Natural History Museum is full of artefacts far too valuable to be touched or even looked at too closely, the museum next door is the absolute antithesis of this. As much as children love dinosaurs, they also love buttons to press and levers to pull, and this is where the Science Museum comes into its own! 

The museum is free to enter but donations are accepted and encouraged. 

  • V&A Museum of Childhood  

All of these museums have something for the whole family, but this one is solely aimed at children, both present day and the child that still resides in every adult. 

This is the official UK national collection of childhood memorabilia, stretching back as far as the 1600s, so every generation is covered. There’s games, toys, dolls, teddy bears as well as clothes and learning apparatus. 

Like many of London’s museums, entry is free although donations are always encouraged. 

  • Apsley House  

This might not be the most famous museum in London but as it’s known as ‘Number 1, London’ it certainly has the most famous address. 

This was the home of the first Duke of Wellington and now tells the story of his life through his possessions, ornaments and memorabilia. It also houses the Duke’s impressive art collection. 

Tickets are £8.30 for adults, £5.00 for children and £21.60 for families. 

  • Saatchi Gallery  

A world famous and well respected private collection of artwork that is on display to the public at this gallery in Duke of York Square. 

The primary focus of the exhibition is to show off the talents of young artists and people from around the world who haven’t perhaps had the exposure they deserve in the UK.  

This is a great place to visit for fans of contemporary art. Its temporary innovative exhibitions will also impress all but the very hardest of sceptics. 

Entry to the popular gallery is free. 

Shopping

Knightsbridge is quite simply a fantastic place to go shopping, for people with bottomless wallets as well as dreamers and browsers. 

It’s a place that some of the world’s most famous department stores call home, but it also has places nearby which should appeal to those people who like their shopping at a much more bargain basement level. 

  • Harrods 

Harrods is famous, Harrods is huge, and its 330 departments sell practically everything imaginable. It’s also been around for 170 years. 

There’s fashion from Prada, Dior and all the biggest names in the industry. There’s a food hall, homeware, toys and some of the finest restaurants to dine in too. 

Until fairly recently there was also a pets department, which had been known to sell the odd lion cub or two. 

  • Harvey Nichols 

Hot on the hills of Harrods in terms of notoriety is Harvey Nichols, though what most people don’t know that it’s actually the longer established of the two, having been in Knightsbridge since 1831.  

Initially it was a shop that sold linen, but over the years it has expanded to be one of the most fashionable shops in London, featuring brands such as Stella McCartney, Valentino and Gucci. 

There’s also pretty good eats and drinks too. 

  • Sloane Street 

More luxury and exclusivity can be found outside too, on an entire street and square to be exact. Sloane Street and Sloane Square make up one of the most exclusive shopping areas in the capital. 

There’s a catwalk, if you will, of outlets from high end fashion designers with the odd luxury townhouse interspersed amongst them. Many top designers have their flagship stores in the area, Giorgio Armani, Valentino and Gucci are among them. 

  • Brompton Road 

Brompton Road starts at Knightsbridge Underground station and stretches past South Kensington tube before becoming the Fulham Road (and subsequently leading to Stamford Bridge, the home of Chelsea Football Club). 

This means it winds its way through some go the most wealthy residential areas in London, which is why it is mostly home to very expensive shops and luxury hotels. 

Harrods itself can be found at the east end of Brompton Road. 

  • Kings Road 

The Sloane Street of the 1960s. Today it’s a mixture of exclusive and High Street, probably due to its journey from top fashion in the sixties through being the birthplace of punk in the seventies. The infamous shop of punk queen Vivienne Westwood can still be found here. 

As well as boutiques and every day names there’s also plenty of places to eat and relax. There’s also bargain antiques to be found at the Chelsea Antiques Market. 

Nowadays the Kings Road is also famed for interior design, Peter Jone’s and Cath Kidston both have outlets here. 

Food & Drink in Knightsbridge 

As one could imagine, Knightsbridge has some pretty chic restaurants amongst its streets and in its luxury hotels. 

This is the place in London where some of the top chefs from the UK and around the world do battle with their high end eateries. The winner of this battle is, of course, the diners who get to experience some of the best cuisine to be found anywhere. 

  • Harry’s Dolce Vita 

This Italian inspired restaurant may not be as well known as some of the other establishments owned by its parent company, who also have The Ivy and J. Sheekey in their stable. But once its 50’s/60s decor and fare is experienced it’s not easily forgotten.  

The wooden panelling, gold framed mirrors and soft lighting make it look like the set of an old movie. Even the tables are laid out as if the diners are preparing to watch a cabaret. 

The food is classic Italian with bolognese and ragu and with desserts such as tiramisu and panna cotta. 

 Address: 27-31, Basil St, Knightsbridge, London SW3 1BB 

  • Bar Boulud  

This is a hotel restaurant owned by Daniel Boulud who is famed for his restaurants in New York. Despite being French, this is the first restaurant he has opened in Europe. 

The feel inside is definitely New York. It’s loud, bustling with people and conversation, wooden floorboards, large semi circle bar and an open kitchen. 

The food, however, is unmistakably French with classic items such as steak tartare, frites and plenty of chunky pâtés. As a high five to its American origins, the menu has a short but impressive burger list too. 

 Address: 66 Knightsbridge, London SW1X 7LA 

  • Dinner by Heston 

In the same location as Bar Boulud is an alternative option from one of the UK’s most notorious experimental chefs, Heston Blumenthal. This is, in fact, his only restaurant in the capital. 

This is a place which is something of a mix between the Science Museum and a medieval banquet. The pineapple roasting pulley in the centre of the restaurant and the Meat Fruit are a nod to Heston’s ‘mad scientist’ reputation. The saddle of lamb with sweetbreads are a nod to history. 

The Meat Fruit, by the way, is chicken liver parfait made to look like a mandarin. 

 Address: 66 Knightsbridge, London SW1X 7LA 

  • Petrus  

As celebrity chefs go, there’s probably just one British chef who is as well known on the other side of the Atlantic as he is on this one. And it’s a name known by practically everyone, not just those in the culinary industry. 

This Gordon Ramsay owned restaurant is Michelin starred, futuristically designed and has a menu which comes at a fixed price (though not a small one). 

The menu is eclectic European and complex, amaranth smoked duck and the sautéed foie gras are particular favourites. 

 Address: 1 Kinnerton St, Belgravia, London SW1X 8EA 

  • Zuma 

This restaurant serves small plates of food to be shared. What most people would probably call tapas is actually izakaya-style dining, a Japanese way of eating normally found in bars. 

The kitchen is open plan and is dominated by an impressive grill which serves some of the best barbecued meats around. There’s also a very good sushi bar, if the smell from the grill isn’t too tempting. 

 Address: 5 Raphael St, Knightsbridge, London SW7 1DL 

Limehouse

Located on the northern bank of the iconic river Thames, Limehouse is a district in East London in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. It is approximately 3 miles from Charing Cross.

The area stretches from Limehouse Basin in the west to the boundary of the former Chinatown in Pennyfields in the east and from the Thames in the south to the Victory Bridge in the north.

The neareststation is Limehouse station that is connected to the DLR train line and takes you to Bank in the City in just 6 minutes. Limehouse is situated between Fenchurch Street and West Ham on the main line and between Shadwell and Westferry on the DLR.

The closest underground near Limehouse is Canary Wharf underground tube station with the Jubilee line, which is 1.3 miles away.

Limehouse is also well connected to the National Road Network.

London Bridge

London Bridge and the surrounding area is often considered the gateway from the more residential south of London to the more corporate and entertaining north. This is probably why it offers such an eclectic mix of things to do. 

Tower Bridge 

It may seem like a strange thing to say, but one of the very best views of Tower Bridge is to be had from its rival bridge, a little way up the river.  

Tower Bridge is one of the must-have photos of London and it has to be said that it’s everything that London Bridge is not. It’s unique, it’s photogenic, it’s interesting, it does interesting mechanics stuff. 

Take a look at it from London Bridge, it’s pretty spectacular. 

Tickets cost £9.20 for adults and £4.20 for children, with other offers available for groups of various sizes. 

HMS Belfast 

One of the things that make the view of Tower Bridge from London Bridge so special is everything that’s going on in between. HMS Belfast is one of those things. 

It’s moored alongside London Bridge Pier and as one of only three ships from the bombardment fleet at the D-Day landings still, afloat it deserves plenty of respect. And a visit! 

As well as a rich history, there are ladders to climb, guns to touch and real-life stories about life on a ship to hear. 

Adult tickets cost £18 and child tickets cost £9, with various deductions made for online purchases and groups. 

Borough Market 

Put quite simply, anyone who claims to be a foodie and hasn’t visited Borough Market is most probably a fraud! This is a place where people can quite literally eat their way around. 

There’s food to eat now, food to take away as well as the best ingredients from around the world. There’s beer, wine, fruit, veg, meats and everything in between. Even if food is the last thing on the mind, it’s worth going just for the smells, or even because it is the oldest market to be found anywhere in London. 

Entry is free to the market but, naturally, the goods and boutiques all cost and vary in price from stall to stall. 

The Golden Hinde 

The London Bridge area is a place that is genuinely fun to explore. It has grown naturally over the course of centuries and offers a unique rabbit’s run of nooks and crannies where all manner of things can be found. One of those lucky finds might just be the Golden Hind, a reconstructed model of the ship Sir Francis Drake used to sale around the world in. 

Admire the outside for free or better still, get a guided tour from someone in a sixteenth-century costume! 

Tickets for adults and children cost £5 while a family of 4 pay £15. 

The Shard 

When there’s a tall building in a city it just has to be climbed, or whatever the equivalent is when the ‘climb’ is actually a comfortable and fast lift ride. 

The shard isn’t just the tallest building in London. It’s not just the tallest building in the UK. It’s the tallest building in Europe and it has unrivalled views of one of the most historic cities in the world. 

It’s not just about the view from the top either. There are also bars and restaurants to visit inside. They may only be halfway up, but they’re still higher than anywhere else around. 

Tickets are for adults only, with the costs varying depending on the ticket and package that is bought. Standard tickets (the cheapest) cost £25, while all-inclusive tickets (the most expensive) are £39. 

Food & Drink in London Bridge 

London is a place full of cuisines from all over the world, some of which are the very best the genre has to offer. London Bridge is no exception to this. Here are some of the best places to have a bite in the area. 

Arthur Hooper’s 

Believe it or not, this is an Italian restaurant and one of the most unique in the capital. 

The odd name is for the greengrocer and his shop who originally occupied the space. However, the name isn’t the only odd thing about the place. On arrival, it could be mistaken for a dingy wine bar, which essentially it is too. But the small, perfect plates of cured meats, mussels, and duck ragù, amongst plenty more, say otherwise. 

Address: 8 Stoney St, London SE1 9AA. 

Oblix 

Food with a view is always a hit, even when it comes to a bill as eye-watering as the one produced by a visit to Oblix surely will be. 

The decor is glitzy and glamourous and screams opulence no matter what city one finds themselves in. However, nabbing a table by the window will leave diners in no doubt as to exactly where they are. The stunning London vista is unmistakable. 

Aside from the views, the food is pretty good too, eclectic menus, well presented and very tasty. 

Address: The Shard, 31 St Thomas St, London SE1 9RY 

Restaurant Story 

If travelling with people who need a Michelin Star displayed outside a restaurant before they could possibly consider entering, then this is probably one for them. 

Located near Tower Bridge, this is the ultimate in modern cuisine, some of the plates look like they would be more at home being displayed in the Tate Modern as opposed to a restaurant. 

The plates are the ‘chapters’ which give this restaurant its unusual name and they certainly keep diners interested as a feast for the eyes, nose and thankfully the mouth. 

Address: 199 Tooley St, London SE1 2JX 

Pique-Nique 

Worth going just for the name! Rest assured, this isn’t a French, outdoor themed picnic eatery with Scotch eggs and crisps. 

Though it is very very French. 

The location is very much indoors in an unmistakable Tudor pavilion right next to Tanner Street Park in Bermondsey. A very British setting with a very Gallic interior. 

The staff is all French-speaking and the menu is in French and completely untranslated. It really is a little bit of Paris in South London. The dishes are all ultra-traditional and they also offer a takeaway roast dinner, though it has to be ordered an hour ahead! 

Address: Tanner St, Bermondsey, London SE1 3LD 

Roast 

Talking of roast dinners. The roast is a very British restaurant specialising in the most important of British meals, the Sunday roast.  

Although it has to be said, roast dinners may be the influence but there’s not much in the way of tradition going on here, more like re-invention. Unless families around the country really are sitting down to Goosnargh chicken and quail’s egg pie with all the trimmings?! 

Go for breakfast and Sunday lunch, those are the big events. The restaurant is always busy and loud and overlooks the crowds at the Borough market, who are also busy and loud. 

Address: The Floral Hall, Stoney St, London SE1 1TL 

Shopping in London Bridge 

London Bridge doesn’t have any of the endless shopping streets or massive malls that other parts of London boast, but it does have shops that cater to nearly everyone’s tastes. Fashion, gifts, antiquities, and food can be found in shops and markets throughout the area. 

Borough Market 

Not just an attraction but a very practical place to go food shopping, as long as an early arrival and a quick visit is planned. This place can get rammed (and that’s an understatement!) 

The reason it is so popular is that it is a place where people can go to get exceptional produce. The meat on sale here has been farmed by the people on the stalls, the fish is the same, the people selling it have been involved in catching it. 

This makes the market and its people a fountain of food knowledge too, not to mention being more ethical than most other food retailers. 

Hays Galeria 

Hays Galeria is a unique building on the south bank of the Thames which is home to offices and flats as well as restaurants and shops. 

It was originally warehouse space, but is now covered with a glass roof and is a Grade II listed building. 

Around the dominant sculpture in the middle of the floor, there are shops and barrows selling arts, crafts, and other souvenirs. The barrows are a dedication to the market that used to operate in the space. 

London Bridge Station 

Since the major refurbishment, London Bridge Station has become a template for what a decent city railway station should look like. The facilities are second to none and in the likely event that the trains don’t run on time, there is no chance of going hungry or un-entertained. 

There are plenty of shops and restaurants within the station itself with new retailers opening all the time. Hamleys, the world-famous toy shop, has a small outlet here, as does Accessorize, The Body Shop, T.M. Lewin and Cath Kidston, amongst many others. 

Bermondsey Market 

Bermondsey Antiques Market is one of the premier places to examine and buy antiques in Europe. It is a great place to buy souvenirs or maybe even make amazing discoveries.  

Anything and everything is sold here, as long as it’s old or has a history. This includes cutlery & crockery, furniture & decorations, and jewellery & clothes and lots more besides. 

Have an antique related question? Bring it along, these are some of the most knowledgeable people around. 

Maltby Street Market 

Similar to the Borough market but with a history of just ten years as opposed to a thousand! 

Still, the fact that it has taken only ten years to garner such a fantastic reputation should be lauded, as well as the fact that it is not as crowded as Borough Market. Though it’s still incredibly popular. 

The food on offer is varied and ethical and most importantly smells and tastes phenomenal. It also comes from all over the world, actively demonstrating London’s huge diversity. 

Churches and Cathedrals in London Bridge 

London Bridge is an area with a rich history and has lots of historic buildings to explore. The most predominant type of old building is religious ones that have been allowed to survive amongst the predominantly modern glass structures. 

Southwark Cathedral 

As large religious buildings in London go, Southwark Cathedral might not be the most famous. St Paul’s Cathedral and Westminster Abbey probably top that list. However, for any fans of history and architecture (or even religion itself), it would be a must-visit. 

This is a very special cathedral with a beautiful interior, some of the features on display have remained unchanged for over 800 years, almost as long as the millennium for which this church has stood for. 

St Magnus the Martyr 

England has a curious tradition of dedicating churches to the wellbeing of certain professions. St Magnus, therefore, looks out for both fishmongers and plumbers. 

The church can be found in Lower Thames Street close by to the Monument to the Great Fire of London. It’s a stunning piece of architecture and its prominent location has led to its mention in works by some of England’s best authors, such as Charles Dickens in his infamous ‘Oliver Twist’, and T.S. Eliot in the poem ‘The Waste Land’. 

All Hallows by the Tower 

Previously called St Mary the Virgin, this is an Anglican Church that overlooks the Tower of London and is one of the oldest churches in London, having been founded back in 675. 

The church has a fascinating history of survival. In 1650 some barrels of gunpowder being stored in the churchyard exploded, causing extensive damage. In 1666 it survived the Great Fire of London when nearby buildings were ordered to be destroyed in order to save it. 

In fact, Samuel Pepys himself describes climbing the spire to take a look at the destruction. 

Later on, German bombers caused extensive damage in the Blitz, it was finally fully restored in 1957. 

St Dunstan in the East 

Halfway between London Bridge and the Tower of London sits another church that was destroyed by the attacks on London during the Second World War. This one, however, was not restored to its former glory and was left as it stood. 

Nowadays it is an overgrown but serene and beautiful public garden, with a violent history that now unfathomable. It was unlucky enough to be badly damaged in the Great Fire of London too. 

Nowadays all that is left after the German bombs are the north and south walls, as well as the steeple and tower. The tower itself having been built by the esteemed Sir Christopher Wren after the previous disaster. 

St Olaves Church 

One of a few churches in the city which escaped the Great Fire of London completely unscathed. Significantly it is also the final resting place of the famous documenter of the disaster, Samuel Pepys. 

Maida Vale

Known affectionately as ‘Little Venice’ by locals due to its extensive networks of serene canals, Maida Vale is an affluent district nestled in between Paddington, St John’s Wood and Kilburn. Although Maida Vale’s soaring Edwardian mansions are undeniably charming, it is the waterways that provide the flavour of this quaint neighbourhood.

Perhaps most famous for its BBC studios on Delaware Road, Maida Vale is a predominately residential neighbourhood in West London. Peppered with trendy bars and chic cafes, this reserved neighbourhood is ideal for swirling cocktails. Maida Vale tube station, served by the Bakerloo line, makes travelling to central London prompt and hassle free.

Marylebone

Attractions in Marylebone

Marylebone is an affluent area of London famous for preserving its village-like ambience despite its central location. Nestled between some of London’s most iconic locations, Marylebone offers visitors a wealth of attractions, landmarks and things to do. The area is also extremely well connected with regards to public transport, so anyone staying locally will find they have access to just about any attraction in the capital - from its historic royal palaces to its world-class museums. 

  • Lisson Gallery

Opened in the late 1960s, Lisson Gallery has gone on to become one of the most influential contemporary art galleries in the world. Today, the gallery’s reputation for thought-provoking shows is as well known as ever, with a new generation of cutting edge talents showcased throughout the year. There various exhibitions hosted at the Lisson promise to provide a challenging, yet accessible experience of the modern art scene and often runs shows in conjunction with its galleries in New York and Shanghai. 

Entry to the gallery is usually free, however, there may be a fee for some exhibitions, so it is always best to inquire. 

  • Regents Park

The northern end of Marylebone is bordered by the stunning Regent’s Park, with its iconic fountains, Georgian terraces and impressive gardens. Aside from being arguably the most picturesque park in London, Regents Park also offers plenty of activities and events throughout the year in its open-air theatre. It is also home to the famous London Zoo, one of the city’s top attractions, as well as being generally a fantastic outdoor space to enjoy sports, picnics or just relaxing in the sunshine.

Regent’s Park itself is free to enter, however, certain attractions will charge an entry fee. London Zoo tickets are £31.50 for peak times, but discounts are available for those booking online in advance.

  • Regent Street Cinema

The Regent Street Cinema is a historic theatre hall that specialises in showing classic movies in the format and surroundings they were intended. First opened in 1848 and regarded as "the birthplace of British cinema", the cinema featured the first motion picture shown in the United Kingdom. Aside from its catalogue of classic movies, the venue also hosts educational events dedicated to the history of cinema and has an on-site bar for movie buffs to discuss their favourite films over a few drinks. 

The cinema has shows on every day except Christmas and Boxing Day, with most tickets being priced at £12.

  • Madame Tussauds

The perennial tourist favourite, Madame Tussauds is an attraction that really needs no introduction. Famous for its lifelike recreations of movie stars, pop stars and historical figures, Madame Tussauds now has venues across the world. However, the location in Marylebone road is the original, biggest and best. A fun day out for all the family, the themed galleries offer both entertainment and education. 

Madame Tussauds is open throughout the year. Ticket prices start at £29 with discounts for those buying online.

Museums in Marylebone

London is famous across the world for its incredible museums and thanks to the city’s long and rich history, they can be found in just about every neighbourhood. Marylebone offers a diverse selection of museums within its boundaries, ranging from niche literary museums and quirky galleries to historic royal institutions. Below is a selection of some of the museums in Marylebone.

  • The Royal Academy of Music Museum

The Royal Academy of Music Museum charts the history and considerable contributions of one of the world’s most prestigious conservatories in the world. The museum offers daily tours, detailing the educational process involved in learning to be a world-class classical museum as well as showcasing many historical instruments. The RAMM also holds several free events throughout the year, showcasing the talent of its current members and students. 

Daily tours and many of the events are completely free, however, the museum does accept donations from attendees as a way of funding its programme. 

  • The Sherlock Holmes Museum

Located at the fictional sleuth’s famous address at 221B Baker Street is the Sherlock Holmes Museum - a faithfully preserved Victorian home and study dedicated to the famous Arthur Conan Doyle’s most famous literary creations. The museum offers visitors the chance to step into the world of Sherlock Holmes and the attached shop sells everything from the iconic hat associated with the detective, to special editions of the various books. 

Entry for adults is £15 and tickets can only be purchased upon arrival.

  • Grant Museum of Zoology 

Just a fifteen-minute walk from the centre of Marylebone is the curious yet fascinating Grant Museum of Zoology. Technically part of the University of London, this small museum was established by Robert Edmond Grant in 1828 as a teaching collection of zoological specimens and material for dissection. Today it includes several impressive specimens in Victorian style glass jars, which gives the whole place a slightly eerie historic quality. However, the Grant Museum is still an educational experience and visitors have the chance to learn various anatomical details and anomalies of wildlife from across the globe.

The museum is open daily but mostly from lunchtimes. Entry is free.

  • The London Transport Museum

London is famous across the world for its various public transport innovations - from the world’s first underground system to the city’s iconic red buses. The London Transport Museum, as the name suggests, is dedicated to the various vehicles, pioneering minds and feats of engineering feats that have kept Londoners moving across the city over the centuries. It features large scale exhibits including historic cars and buses, as well as background information on the development of London’s transport infrastructure. An ideal day out for those visiting with family and just a short walk from Marylebone. 

General admission for adults is £18.50 though children enter free of charge. The museum is open 7 days a week, only closing over the Christmas holiday period. 

Food and Drink in Marylebone

London is known as a haven for food lovers and Marylebone is no exception. With numerous upscale restaurants, fashionable bars and even renowned street food vendors, the area boasts a wealth of choice when it comes to food and drink. 

  • Winter Garden 

Housed in the stunning glass-roofed atrium of an elegant hotel, Winter Garden offers contemporary European cuisine in stunning surroundings. With menus for breakfast, lunch and dinner, the restaurant is known for its relaxing, international atmosphere and caters to all tastes. It is also situated in the very centre of Marylebone so is a wonderful opportunity to enjoy world-class dining after a day exploring the sights. 

Address: The Landmark London, 222 Marylebone Rd, Marylebone, London NW1 6JQ

  • Texture Restaurant

A Michelin-starred restaurant, Texture offers a fusion of Scandinavian and Asian cuisine from chef Aggi Sverrisson. The restaurant promises a lighter dining experience, avoiding heavy foods whilst still providing a sumptuous meal. The restaurant itself also offers an elegant setting for an afternoon lunch or dinner event, with stylish furnishing and artwork adorning the walls.

Address: 34 Portman Street, London W1H 7BY

  • Orrery

Orrery is a relatively new addition to Marylebone’s restaurant scene - offering a modern take on classic French cuisine in a converted stable block. Of course, the interior has been refitted to offer an elegant restaurant setting, however, the building’s unique past gives it an unusual atmosphere with excellent views of the neighbouring church. It also offers a roof terrace for enjoying a drink or two in the open air.

Address: 55 Marylebone High St, Marylebone, London W1U 5RB

  • Lurra

Lurra is an excellent choice for those seeking something a little less formal. Lurra offers chargrilled cuisine in the Basque style as well as Galician dishes. It is also known for its excellent wine list and offers a host of other snacks and drinks for those looking to grab a quick bite. The restaurant also offers a provide dining space for corporate events.

Address: 9 Seymour Pl, Marylebone, London W1H 5BA

  • Twist

Twist is another fantastic option for informal dining, offering modern tapas using seasonal ingredients, providing a unique take on many classic dishes. The restaurant prides itself on being ‘ingredient-led’ and emphasising on healthy and sustainable food. The restaurants chic interior offers two spaces - a quieter downstairs kitchen for those looking to enjoy a romantic meal, as well as a more vibrant dining area for larger groups. 

Address: 42 Crawford St, Marylebone, London W1H 1JW

  • Roganic 

Another Michelin-starred establishment, Roganic started life as a pop-up eatery before growing into one of Marylebone’s most popular restaurants. Featuring an eclectic menu from the renowned chef, Simon Rogan, Roganic prides itself on offering only the best produce and its chic yet welcoming interior provides the perfect setting to enjoy an evening meal. 

Address: 5-7 Blandford St, Marylebone, London W1U 3DB

Shopping in Marylebone

London is one of the world’s top shopping destinations - with many travellers coming to the city primarily for that very reason. England’s capital offers everything: historic department stores, modern shopping malls and world-famous markets. Marylebone itself is perfectly situated to access all of these - boasting some of London’s most famous shopping locations as well as plenty of hidden gems. Whether travellers are looking for global brands or unique souvenir trinkets, they will find it and more whilst shopping in Marylebone.

  • Oxford Street 

London’s most famous shopping destination, Oxford Street, runs along the south side of Marylebone. With over a mile-and-a-half of shops and services, including some 90 flagship stores, Oxford Street is one of the top locations in the world for a bit of retail therapy. Along the famous street, shoppers will also find high-street brands such as Topshop, Gap, River Island, Primark, X and the UK's iconic department stores, including Selfridges, John Lewis & Partners, Debenhams, House of Fraser and Marks & Spencer

  • St Christopher's Place

St Christopher’s Place is a lively pedestrianised shopping zone in the heart of Marylebone. The area is particularly noted for its high-end stores, such as Castle Fine Art, Diverso, Georgia Hardinge, Ingle & Rhode, and Kurt Keiger. However, it also boasts plenty of high street favourites, such as The Body Shop and Jigsaw. After visitors are finished shopping, they will also find that St Christopher’s Place boasts a huge amount of bars and restaurants, as well as several cafes. 

  • London Paddington

London Paddington station is one of the city’s major transport hubs, but it also features a great selection of shops and services. The retail units are mostly filled with popular brands such as Lush, WH Smith, FatFace, Accessorize and Boots. As such, Paddington is a great place to pick up a few essential supplies en route into Marylebone. 

  • Church Street Market

For something a little different, Church Street is a bustling event where visitors can get the authentic London street market experience. The market includes the Marylebone antiques district at one end, with the traditional fruit, veg and fish stalls at the other. In between there’s just about everything the ardent shopper could wish for, such as alternative fashions, household goods, jewellery, luggage, leather goods and plenty of street food. The market runs Monday to Saturday from 8 am to 6 pm.

Mayfair

Mayfair, the upscale and exclusive district of Georgian houses, is home to various attractions that add an extra splash of grandeur and importance to the diverse character of London. Given its high-end appeal, it’s fair to say that the attractions settle well into its posh disposition. Some of the top attractions can be found below:

  • Savile Row 

One of London’s top tailoring streets, finding the perfect suit will be as easy as paying the huge cheque. The street itself is always a good stroll and window shopping is always fun. But if buying a suit in the same street as Winston Churchill, Prince Charles, Lord Nelson and Ian Fleming sounds good, then step in and get measured up. Two of the best tailors down the street include Gieves & Hawkes, and Henry Poole & Co.

  • The Royal Institution 

Founded by Britain’s best scientists, this is where the history of discovery can be witnessed and explored. With guest lectures (including the infamous Christmas lectures) and the Faraday Museum, there’s a lot of wonders to be explored. While it may not be the Science Museum, it is still an essential experience.

  • Grosvenor Square 

The centrepiece of the Duke of Westminster’s Mayfair property, this green square is another place to relax when the day gets too long. It is also surrounded by a few embassies and was once the home of the US Embassy back in the day. 

  • Berkeley Square 

Similar to the above, it's a green spot to chill in or walk around for a bit of fresh air. While it may not have the extravagance nor relevance of the former green square, it does still fulfil its purpose. But it also has a fair amount of history with the now-demolished Landsdowne House being the former residence of multiple UK Prime Ministers in the 18th and 19th centuries.

  • The Palm Beach Casino 

Blackjack, poker and all the rest can be played here by those that want to try their luck and win a “fortune”. But there’s more than just the nature of “luck” here, there’s the bar and restaurants as well where the finest drinks and scrumptious foods can be indulged in to raise a bad night. Remember, to play responsibly.

Museums in Mayfair

We all love a good museum or gallery to throw away the time and to broaden our horizons. Whether it’s the dawning of humanity, historical battles or a Van Gogh painting, we all want to be enthralled by knowing or seeing something unique. Mayfair’s high-end appeal doesn't put a drab on such attractions, as the district is home to a few points of interest and galleries that are worth the visit.

  • Handel and Hendrix in London 

See two homes (next door to each other) that were occupied by the two music legends. They may have lived centuries apart but observing their mutual love of music and how London played a pivotal role in both careers is fun for Handel and Hendrix enthusiasts. Plus, concerts can be enjoyed here as well.

Tickets cost £10 for adults and £5 for children.

  • Halcyon Gallery 

This contemporary art gallery brings some of the most renown artists under one roof, like Picasso, Lorenzo Quinn, Andy Warhol, Robert Lenkiewicz and even personal works by Bob Dylan! A range of exhibitions happens throughout the year so multiple visits are often essential.

Some of the exhibitions might cost.

  • Sadie Coles HQ 

Another contemporary gallery, this is definitely one to visit when there’s time during the London adventure. Some of the artists on display include Michele Abeles, Carl Andre, Uri Aran, John Currin, Sam Durant, Urs Fischer, Lawrence Lek, Hilary Lloyd, Rudolf Stingel, Ryan Sullivan, Paloma Varga Weisz and Andrea Zittel. Experience the works of rising talents that will take the world by storm.

Tickets to exhibitions may cost. Please check before heading out.

  • Marlborough 

A gallery of the fine arts, this is for those that really have an affiliation for the arts and love to see a few of the wonders that are being crafted by the rising talents. Founded in the 1940s, this gallery still showcases various exhibitions that will impress all art lovers, old and new. Not to be missed.

Be aware that some exhibitions may cost.

  • Burlington House 

This Grade II listed building is a rare sight and is home to numerous societies like the Geological Society of London, Linnean Society of London, Royal Astronomical Society, Society of Antiquaries of London, Royal Society of Chemistry and the Royal Academy (which it is most famous for). While it used to be home to the Earls of Burlington, it now showcases a few art exhibitions every now and again.

Certain societies will have restricted access and the exhibitions may cost. But it is the ideal spot for a decent selfie.

Food and Drink in Mayfair

If posh restaurants are top of the menu, then Mayfair doesn’t disappoint. With its upscale reputation, the district obviously has its fair share of fine dining options. But for those that want a more relaxed atmosphere, there are other options to consider that still serve great food but without the tuxedo demand.

  • 34

Home to delicate meals of strong cocktails, this restaurant will fill the gut of any traveller. With its polished oak parquet, soft lighting and colourful contemporary art collection, the restaurant have an Upper East Side-style that is enchanting. Enjoy the likes of lobster macaroni, Moroccan spiced lamb shoulder, yellowfin tuna steak and Dover sole. 

Address: 34 Grosvenor Square, S Audley St, Mayfair, London, W1K 2HD

  • Bentley’s Oyster Bar & Grill

Take a dip in the ocean’s cuisine when you wine and dine at this sublime restaurant. While oysters are their speciality, the fish and chips are incredible, as are the poached haddock, lobster, grilled seabass and the Irish Hereford sirloin. They also do oyster masterclasses if you want to bring the delicate cuisine home with you.

Address:11-15 Swallow St, Mayfair, London, W1B 4DG

  • Bombay Bustle

Harvest the spicy and scrumptious tastes of India when you choose this restaurant for your evening meal. Set your tongue aflame from red hot curries or soothe the senses with a delicately made korma. Traditional specialities can also be enjoyed fro those that want a little more refined.

Address: 29 Maddox St, Mayfair, London, W1S 2PA

  • Burger & Lobster

The clue is in the name. For mouth-watering burgers and lobsters, you can’t get any better than this American-style diner. While there are many of these around London, the one in Mayfair is the original B&L. Indulge in the most succulent and tasteful of meats in an upscale location.

Address: 29 Clarges St, Mayfair, London, W1J 7EF

  • Cecconi’s

Grab a slice of Italy in one of London’s posh locations at any time in the day - breakfast, lunch and dinner are served seven days a week. From spaghetti lobster, veal cannelloni, crab ravioli to plant-based options, everyone can find something to feast on. Be sure to come with friends and family to share the taste.

Address: 5A Burlington Gardens, Mayfair, London, W1S 3EP

  • China Tang

Situated within The Dorchester, this Art Decco and stylish restaurant is reputed to serve the best Cantonese cuisine outside of China. And given its location, that reputation is not surprising. While the interior serves the pre-war Shanghai extravagance, the food simply serves to fill the heart and soul. Be sure to try the juicy Peking duck - arguably their centrepiece.

Address: 53 Park Ln, Mayfair, London, W1K 1QA

  • Chisou

The Land of Rising Sun is here in London to fill you to the brim. From the sushi to the noodle soups to the izakaya, every succulent and soulful aspect of Japan can be savoured to the core. The location alone is enough to guarantee that this is one of the top Japanese restaurants in London.

Address: 22-23 Woodstock St, Mayfair, London, W1C 2AR

  • Corrigan’s Mayfair

Arguably one of the poshest restaurants in the area, this is the home to acclaimed celebrity Irish chef, Richard Corrigan, and his delightful palette. Enjoy the scrumptious nature of pressed duck liver, caramelised veal sweetbread, Dorset crab bisque, seasonal oysters and so much more. The surroundings alone will add an extra rich layer to the night out.

Address: 28 Upper Grosvenor St, Mayfair, London, W1K 7EH

  • Galvin at The Athenaeum

You can find gem this at one of London’s posh hotels, The Athenaeum, where business and leisure travellers go for a meal that goes above and beyond. Within the Michelin starred restaurant, Afternoon Tea can be enjoyed along with salmon, crab, duck and shrimp dishes. It’s best to book a table beforehand.

Address: 116 Piccadilly, Mayfair, London, W1J 7BJ

  • Le Gavroche

Often referred to as “a fine-dining dream”, Le Gavroche is headed by Michel Rioux Jr., one of the most renown chefs in the world, with a taste for excellence. And indeed, that is what can be devoured here - the very best. France doesn’t seem so far away when you indulge in the dishes and styles that make French dining the very best.

Address: 43 Upper Brook St, Mayfair, London, W1K 7QR

Shopping in Mayfair

Luxury shopping is always a treat, and never more so than in the prestigious district of Mayfair, home of Savile Row, Bond Street and excessive opulence. With a variety of Victorian arcades full of boutique items and shopping streets that are as infamous as Big Ben, Mayfair really does provide the spending spree experience that shoppers want.

  • Burlington Arcade 

This Victorian arcade is home to a variety of luxury brands for the rich and famous. These include the likes of True Grace, Michael Rose, Carat London, Strathberry, House of Cashmere, Chanel, Ciro, Sterling Diamond, Vintage Watch Company, La Perla and Armour Winston. Be sure to have a bit of money saved as the goods here are not cheap.

  • West One

Connected to Bond Street Underground Station, this shopping centre houses a few familiar brands is is the perfect stop before getting on the tube. With the likes of Holland & Barnett, JD Sports, Scribbler, Boots, and eateries like Joe & the Juice, Pret, Wasabi and Notes, this is a fine addition to the district.

  • Oxford Street

One of the most famous shopping streets in the city, this is where all the big brands can be found. These include Adidas, All Saints, Burton, Disney Store, Debenhams, Dune, Cap, House of Fraser, JD Sports, Kingdom of Sweets, M&S, Next, Nike, Oasis, Swarovski, The Perfume Shop and Watches of Switzerland. 

Monument

The area around the Monument is mainly known as The City and this is where you find all of the city workers. The Monument is the tallest freestanding stone column in the world. Designed by Sir Christopher Wren, The Monument celebrates the Great Fire of London. It is located near the northern end of London Bridge. The Monument stands at the junction of Monument Street and Fish Street Hill. It is on the east of Fish Street Hill that extends to Pudding Lane.

Monument tube station and the connected Bank station offer excellent transport links with the Circle, District, Hammersmith & City, Northern line and the DLR.

Old Street

A street in Central and East London, Old Street runs west to east from Goswell Road in Clerkenwell in the London Borough of Islington to the crossroads where it gets to Shoreditch High Street to the south, Kingsland Road to the north, Hackney Road to the east in Shoreditch in the London Borough of Hackney.

Old Street on the Northern line is the nearest London Underground Station. It is also situated on the National Rail Northern City Line.

Richmond

Attractions in Richmond 

Richmond upon the Thames is a stunning part of London that is loved by the people that live there and visitors alike.  

In many ways, Richmond itself is an attraction, a picturesque village by the river with cobbled streets and parks where wild deer roam free. It’s sometimes difficult to believe that this haven is actually part of London. 

There’s so much to see and do in and around Richmond, here are some of the best attractions. 

Kew Gardens 

One of London’s most famous attractions and one of the most famous horticultural centres in the world. 

The Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew is one of the most important centres in the world for botanical research. As well as a place that attracts nearly 2 million people a year to see the wondrous plant species, it is also a place that employs more than 1,100 people who are at the top of their profession when it comes to flora. 

There are almost eight and a half million specimens of plants at Kew and more than 27,000 can be enjoyed in the form of living plants. 

Tickets are £12.50 for adults and £3.50 for children. 

Hampton Court Palace  

Apparently, the favourite place to stay of one Henry VIII and it’s easy to see why. The Tudor palace screams magnificence from the exterior, and that’s before the state rooms and galleries inside have been taken in. 

The huge kitchens are also something to behold, high standard catering facilities are something that would be expected inside a home of Henry VIII. 

During summertime, the gardens are pretty special too, there are over 60 acres of carefully manicured scenery to enjoy, including a famous maze. 

Tickets are £21.30 for adults and £10.70 for children. 

Richmond Park 

Covering 2,500 acres, Richmond Park is the largest Royal Park in London. Richmond may be a peaceful village in itself, but Richmond Park takes tranquility to the next level with its ancient woodlands, greens and ponds. 

There are plenty of animals about the place too, from beautiful butterflies to a famed herd of more than 650 deer. 

There are man-made facilities too, in order to make visits as comfortable as possible. These include public toilets, children’s play areas and cafes & kiosks for food and drink. 

The park is free to enter. 

Richmond Theatre 

A beautiful red brick Victorian building located next to the beautiful Richmond Green, this theatre opened in 1899. 

The interior is laid out in the traditional way with upper circles, dress, and stalls done out in plush red materials and tilted details on the surrounds. 

A range of performances can be enjoyed at the theatre, including the curious British pantomime tradition around the holiday period. 

Ticket prices will differ for each performance. 

London Wetland Centre  

This is a wildlife haven covering 105 acres and one of the most relaxing attractions to be found in the capital. 

The wooden walkways through the ponds, wetlands, and fields allow the natural wildlife to flourish whilst still being enjoyed to the full. This allows dragonflies, moths and other insects to thrive as well as amphibians, snakes, birds, and mammals such as water voles and bats. 

Tickets are £11.30 for adults and £7.11 for children. There is also a family ticket option for £35.19. 

Museums in Richmond 

Richmond has the reputation of being a leafy scenic part of London where many of the attractions feature the great outdoors, wildlife, greenery, and general tranquility. However, Richmond has plenty going on culturally too. It has a rich history, not in the literal meaning of the term, although it is an affluent area with a close association with royalty! 

There’s also plenty of other things that Richmond is associated with. Its museums are a testament to this. 

Eel Pie Museum  

This unusually named restaurant may strike confusion into the minds of many. It may even strike fear into the minds of some. 

Eel pie is exactly as it sounds. A pie filled with eels. It’s a traditional London dish which is liked by a few but horrifies many many more. 

Fortunately, this museum has nothing to do with the dish after which it is named. Bizarrely it is actually a celebration of the great music heritage that is associated with Richmond upon Thames. It is a place to see memorabilia from some of Britain’s most well-known bands and music artists, including Eric Clapton, Rod Stewart and the Rolling Stones. 

Tickets are £3.00 for adults. 

Museum of Richmond  

This museum tells the story of Richmond and starts back at the time before history. It then moves through the ages, exploring how Richmond developed as a town and significantly how it became a favourite haunt of royalty. 

The museum opened in 1988 and now contains over 5,000 items, including outfits, toys & games as well as significant local archaeological discoveries. 

The museum is free to enter. 

London Museum of Water & Steam 

Given Richmond’s proximity to the water, this is an apt place to find a museum like this.  

It’s a much more family fun kind of museum than the name suggests. It explores the ways that water got to people’s taps from the Thames in historic times, exhibiting the huge pumping machines that were tasked with it. 

It also dips its toe into water and sewage’s association with public health in Victorian times, and how that was successfully dealt with.  

However, the self explanatory ’Splash Zone’ is probably where most children will enjoy themselves most. 

Tickets are £12.50 for adults and £5.50 for children. There is also a family ticket that can be purchased for £30.50. 

World of Rugby Museum - Twickenham  

Twickenham stadium is the world famous home of English rugby, in the country where this sport started. For anyone lucky enough to get a ticket for match day, the atmosphere is unrivalled. Anybody who has only visited a major stadium for a football match should experience it. 

For those not lucky enough to get a ticket, a behind the scenes tour will have to do. The tour goes into the England player dressing room, the Royal Box, the tunnel from which the players emerge and of course the hallowed turf itself. 

There’s also plenty of memorabilia from rugby around the world to enjoy too, making it a must visit for anyone with even just a passing interest in the sport. 

Tickets are £25.00 for adults, £15.00 for children and £60.00 for a family ticket. 

Royal British Legion Poppy Factory  

One of the most important events to take place in the UK each year is Remembrance Day. A day when the entire country comes together to remember the fallen of war. 

The traditional sign of this event is the poppy and the majority of the British public will be wearing them at this time. Every year, this factory makes 32 million poppies as well as 80,000 wreaths including those laid by dignitaries at the Cenotaph. 

The factory provides tours to see how it’s done. This is a unique opportunity to see the makings of a very British tradition. 

Entry to the museum is free but donations are expected. 

Food & Drink in Richmond 

There are a lot of fantastic eateries to be found in Richmond and the surrounding areas. Many are special restaurants catering to the more affluent members of the local community, but others just offer great quality food at a reasonable price. Here is a selection. 

Antipodea  

A well-priced eatery offering great food for all three meals of the day. As the name suggests, this is an Aussie themed restaurant that delivers what you would expect from the menu, red meats, and grilled fish served straight from the BBQ. The barramundi is a particular favourite but the steaks are great too. 

This Richmond restaurant opened as a consequence of the success of its sister restaurant in Kew, so it’s a formula that has been tried and tested. 

Address: 30 Hill St, Richmond TW9 1TW 

Stein’s  

As the name suggests, this place is named after the famous German beer glass and as you would therefore expect, this is actually a huge beer garden. 

This is a place best enjoyed in the summer months. It may not be Munich, but it is a 300 seater outdoor drinking and dining experience on the tranquil banks of the River Thames. 

The beers are obviously great, but the sausages and pretzels are pretty good too! 

Address: Richmond Towpath, TW10 6UX 

The Ivy Café  

The Ivy is a London restaurant associated with the stars and paparazzi. It was traditionally where the ‘in crowd’ ate and paying through the nose for traditional British fare was considered a necessary extravagance. 

The Ivy Café is a local spin-off from that restaurant, cut from the same cloth. It serves traditional English meals with a twist from breakfast, through brunch and lunch and on to evening meals. 

Address: 9-11 Hill St, Richmond TW9 1SX 

La Buvette  

For those who like the pompous but welcoming formality of French dining, there’s La Buvette, a restaurant that is traditionally gallic in every sense. 

The menus are scrawled on the blackboards, the tablecloths are old school chequered and the wine list is strictly French only. Moules marinière are on offer of course, alongside rustic fish soup and chicken terrine, on the usual menu. 

However, it is Sunday Lunch where La Buvette has achieved local legendary status. 

Address: 6 Church Walk, Richmond TW9 1SN 

Rock & Rose  

This is both a restaurant and a cocktail bar. It’s glitzy and flamboyant but this isn’t reflected in the prices which are pretty reasonable.  

There’s candles, mirrors, pattered wallpaper, funky furniture galore, creating a modern mismatch of genres. 

The cocktail menu is impressive and the food offerings are eclectic, from champagne and oysters and duck à l’orange to racks of ribs and Asian party nibbles. 

Address: 106-108 Kew Rd, Richmond TW9 2PQ 

Architectural & Historic Buildings in Richmond 

Any visitors to the Richmond Museum will find out that Richmond and other towns in the area have a long and varied history, especially during the times when it was seen as a favourite hang-out for the British Monarchy.  

It was around these times that the town began to see the grandeur arrive, the beautiful buildings and architecture that high society demands.  

Many of those buildings can still be seen today. 

Marble Hill House - £7.80 adult, £4.70 child, £20.30 family 

During the eighteenth century the banks of the River Thames between Richmond and Hampton Court Palace was grand villas and mansions standing side by side, separated only by the huge manicured gardens they had around them. Marble Hill House is the last one that still remains completely intact. 

It was built in 1724 for a lady called Henrietta Howard, who was the mistress of the Prince of Wales, who would later become King George II. 

It was designed by some of the most well-respected people of the time, including the poet Alexander Pope, who was a frequent visitor to the house with other intellectuals. 

Pembroke Lodge  

This spectacular house is found amongst an equally spectacular backdrop, the 2,500 acres that are London’s largest Royal park, Richmond Park. 

The lodge itself is set within 11 acres of its very own landscaped gardens, the house sitting in an elevated position offering some breathtaking views to the area west of London. 

It has seen some well-known tenants and owners over the years, including the legendarily beautiful Countess of Pembroke, who in 1787 was said to be close to George III. It has also seen the Victorian Prime Minister Lord John Russell and the philosopher Bertrand Russell spend time there. 

Entry is free. 

Kew Palace  

Hampton Court Palace may be arguably one of the most stunning Royal Palaces, but Kew Palace is undeniably the smallest one. 

The house is a four storey brick hose built in 1631 and closely resembles Dutch houses built at the same time. This is because, before the Royal Family took it over in 1781, it was built by and lived in by a Dutch merchant. 

As part of Kew Gardens, the palace price is incorporated in the ticket price. 

Ham House & Gardens  

A good word to describe seventeenth-century life in Richmond would be ‘opulent’. Royal Court life has seemingly moved into the area full time and in 1610, when Ham House was first constructed, the are was the centre for European fashion and culture. 

The house was extended to its current glory in 1670 and includes an Orangery, ice house, still house and dairy. 

The gardens are also a great place to stroll through during the summer months. 

Tickets cost £5.20 for children, £10.40 for adults and £26.00 for families. 

Chiswick House  

When it was built in 1729 by Lord Burlington it was considered one of the finest buildings of its time. Almost three hundred years later very little has changed, it is still thought of as a classic example of English Palladian villas.  

There’s something for everyone here, beautiful gardens, children’s play areas, and a fine art collection to rival most galleries. 

Tickets cost £5.90 for adults, £3.50 and £15.30 for families. 

Shoreditch

Shoreditch is known the world over as one of the trendiest neighborhoods in London. A mixture of quirky coffee shops, vintage stores and converted warehouses, residents and visitors to the area will find plenty of things to see and do for all ages, and the neighborhood’s excellent transport links mean that the rest of the city is easily accessible as well.

Here Are The Top 5 Attractions In Shoreditch We Recommend To Tourists And Cultural Sightseers alike:

 

  • Brick Lane

 

Brick Lane is a famous street in the East End of London that runs from Spitalfields to Swanfield Street in Bethnal Green. Known for its many curry houses and street markets, Brick Lane is today the heart of the Bangladeshi community in London and represents a history of successive communities of immigrants who settled into the area. 

 

  • Rich Mix

 

Formerly a vast leather factory, Rich Mix is a cinema and multi-arts venue that offers free cultural events to the local community. Stretched over five floors, the building contains a three-screen cinema showing the latest independent films and Hollywood blockbusters, a number of flexible performance and rehearsal spaces, and the headquarters of twenty creative organizations across a wide range of businesses.

 

  • Boxpark

 

Shoreditch’s famous pop-up mall, Boxpark fuses together the concepts of modern street food and the pairing of local and global brands to create a unique shopping and dining destination. Entirely constructed out of refitted shipping containers, Boxpark boasts numerous bars, eateries, lifestyle and clothing stores within its units, and is a perfect embodiment of the enterprising Shoreditch hipster.

 

  • Redchurch Street

 

The ideal destination for fashion shopping, Shoreditch’s Redchurch Street is home to some of the city’s coolest contemporary stores. Peppered with clothing boutiques, interior design inspirations, and hidden coffee and cocktail spots, simply exploring Redchurch Street in an idle hour will yield many surprises, and add a new repertoire to any visitor’s local knowledge.

 

  • Great Eastern Street

 

As Redchurch Street is to fashion, so is Great Eastern Street to art. Hidden among the Press and Subways are a host of hidden treasures set back from every corner, in basements and downside roads, from gorgeous street murals to artisan arts venues, all of which serve to keep Shoreditch’s creative reputation alive. We recommend checking out Village Underground for gigs and raves hosted in a covered railway arch; it’s easily recognizable by the tube carriages on the viaduct roof!

Museums in Shoreditch

Shoreditch is not just known for its bars and art scene, however: there is also plenty of history to discover in its local museums. These range in nature from the esoteric to the general, to the generally fantastical, with all of them guaranteeing an interesting or entertaining visit. 

Here is a list of our top 5 museums and galleries in Shoreditch:

 

  • Museum of Happiness

 

An experiential attraction, the Museum of Happiness provides visitors with a look into the essence of happiness and well-being. Using a variety of interactive exhibits, workshops and events, the museum aims to share the art and science of happiness in playful, reflective ways. Visitors will leave feeling elated, but booking is essential to secure a space, as the museum only opens on Friday evenings and is notoriously oversubscribed. In any case, the £5 entry fee is more than worth it.

 

  • Fine Art Society

 

The Fine Art Society is an appointment-only gallery that preserves and showcases historic and noteworthy artworks from a collection of national and global artists.  Among the contributors listed are names such as George Washington Lambert, Leonard Rosoman, Emma Sargent and Joseph Southall. Take a break from Shoreditch’s street art scene and dive back into the refuge of the old masters. History in the making.

 

  • The Museum of Methodism and John Wesley’s House

 

A museum dedicated to English cleric John Wesley, the founder of Methodism, this venue houses historic objects related to the life of Wesley and his family, as well as presenting his views on faith and social justice in an interactive setting. Entry is free of charge but donations are encouraged to help preserve the collection.

 

  • Whitechapel Gallery

 

Opened in 1901, this public art gallery is one of the most impressive in the country and stands as a symbol of East London’s collective creative spirit. Hosting the works of primarily contemporary artists, both local and international, the gallery also organises retrospective exhibitions and community events and was the first gallery in England to display the works of Pollock and Picasso to the public. Admission is free, but visitors are advised to leave a small donation.

 

  • Jack The Ripper Museum

 

The unsolved Jack The Ripper murders come to life in this Cable Street museum. Featuring original artifacts and waxwork recreations of the crime scenes, the museum carefully chronicles the events of the Ripper case and invites visitors to lend their own theories as to the identity of the notorious killer. A spooky but entertaining delve into London history, the Jack The Ripper Museum is a great attraction to add to the itinerary. Admission costs £10 for adults and £5 for children.

Shopping in Shoreditch

No trip away from home is complete without a little spend in the local stores, and Shoreditch certainly has plenty of options in that regard. Here are our recommendations for the best shopping in Shoreditch, from fashion to gadgets and more:

 

  • AIDA

 

This hip boutique boasts carefully curated apparel and homewares alongside an on-site café serving specialty lattes. The store itself sits in the heart of cosmopolitan East London and stocks a range of menswear, womenswear, shoes and accessories, with the shop also serving as a platform for other independent brands to share their talents and interests. Discover something different from the norm at AIDA.

 

  • Monologue

 

For quality homewares, look no further than Monologue. Though its floor space may be small, its premises are packed to the brim with contemporary furniture, accessories and more, with a unique focus on conceptual items from up-and-coming designers. Visitors with a penchant for modern and Scandinavian-inspired décor should definitely look into this Redchurch Street location. Stunning and stimulating.

 

  • A Child of the Jago

 

As its website announces, A Child of the Jago are the unparalleled purveyors of dimber rigging, hats, and tomfoolery. Though an acquired taste, there’s no denying that these Edwardian-influenced clothes are of very fine quality. Is it retro? Is it anti-brand? We’re not sure, but it’s a dandy look that definitely suits Shoreditch.

Food and Drink in Shoreditch

Exploring the varied cuisine on offer is one of the many perks of visiting a new city. As London is such a diverse city, with much of this diversity present in Shoreditch, there will be many menu options for visitors to enjoy. Fish and chips, pizza, curry, the sky are the limits when it comes to Shoreditch dining. London is a global city after all, so here are some of our favorite eateries in the Shoreditch area:

 

  • Dishoom

 

The buzzing atmosphere and vintage décor of this Bombay-style restaurant is almost as good as the delicious Indian street food on offer.

Address: 7 Boundary St, Hackney, London E2 7JE

 

  • Lyle's

 

Traditional British cuisine is on the cards at Lyle’s as a la carte lunches and set menu suppers, all within an elegant, stripped back dining room set.

Address: Tea Building, 56 Shoreditch High St, Hackney, London E1 6JJ

 

  • The Princess of Shoreditch

 

This renovated two-story gastropub serves delicious British classics with local produce and UK-reared meat and game.

Address: 76-78 Paul St, Hackney, London EC2A 4NE

 

  • Tapas Brindisa

 

As its name suggests, this Spanish restaurant serves classic tapas at the counter or high tables in this modern, glass-fronted setting.

Address: 152 Curtain Rd, Hackney, London EC2A 3AT

 

  • The Last Tuesday Society

 

Hidden within the bizarre world of Viktor Wynd’s Museum of Curiosities, this speakeasy-styled cocktail bar offers carefully curated cocktails inspired by the oddities of its wonderfully strange setting.

Address: 11 Mare St, London E8 4RP

 

  • The Book Club

 

A fun-loving food and arts venue, The Book Club features an eclectic all-day menu, plus a packed calendar of workshops, music and poetry events.

Address: 100-106 Leonard St, Hackney, London EC2A 4RH

Churches and Cathedrals in Shoreditch

Though modern times are becoming increasingly secular, the stunning architecture of many churches and cathedrals still make them places of attraction for tourists and sightseers. Exploring the places of worship around Shoreditch is a great way of whiling away a few loose hours, and many of them make for quite inspirational destinations. 

For those interested in the architecture of religion, here are some of the most notable churches in the Shoreditch area:

 

  • St Leonard’s Church

 

Dedicated to the patron saint of prisoners, St Leonard’s Church currently stands on the site of a number of churches before it, the earliest of which is said to date from around the 12th century. St Leonard’s became an actors’ church due to its proximity to New Inn Yard, the first English theatre, and many of the Elizabethan theatrical fraternity are buried in the medieval church beneath the crypt. Though renovated multiple times over the years, the church remains, along with the Clerk’s House, the oldest building in Shoreditch.

 

  • Shoreditch Tabernacle Baptist Church

 

Known locally as The Tab, the Shoreditch Tabernacle Baptist Church has been a part of the East London community for almost 181 years. Its values are reflected in the diversity of its members, who preach tolerance and unity, and continually strive to transform Shoreditch for the better.

South Bank

London’s arts and entertainment playground, South Bank is an area of Central London, next to the iconic river Thames. Thanks to the amazing location, South Bank has turned into London’s hot spot with thousands of people coming from all parts of the world. The area comprises the Royal Festival Hall, the Hayward Gallery and the Queen Elizabeth Hall. Cultural attractions include The Old Vic Theatre, the Young Vic and the Old Vic Tunnels Theatre.

From South Bank you get amazing views of Big Ben, the Parliament and most of London’s iconic landmarks and needless to say, you can walk around here for hours. The fast-growing area has numerous museums, exhibitions, cafes, restaurants and bookshops.

Some of the credit for the popularity of South Bank goes to the excellent public transport access. For overground and national rail, Waterloo, Blackfriars and Charing Cross stations are all in close proximity to South Bank. The nearby underground stations are Blackfriars Station, Waterloo Station, Westminster, Embankment and Southwark.

Southwark

Southwark is an area of Central London and part of the London Borough of Southwark. One of the oldest parts of London, Southwark is 1.5 miles east of Charing Cross and faces the River Thames. Well known for the old taverns and inns, Southwark is home to the capital’s art and entertainment industry. The first theatres of London were built in Southwark and the plays of Shakespeare were performed for the first time here. Be it the very popular theatre Globe or the famous art gallery Tate Modern, Southwark displays remarkable architecture.

Southwark is pretty famous with artists and professionals owing to the easy connectivity to other parts of the city. West of Southwark is Southwark Underground Station, located between Waterloo and London Bridge stations on the Jubilee line.

Uxbridge

Fifteen miles west of Charing Cross, Uxbridge is a town located in West London that grew significantly over the course of the 20th century in terms of population. Subsequently, as the population increased, Uxbridge underwent significant aesthetic alterations.  Due to the construction of multiple housing developments, Uxbridge represents a clash between modern London and suburbia.

Several significant historical events have occurred in Uxbridge- including attempted negotiations between King Charles I and the Parliamentary Army during the English Civil War. Uxbridge houses the Battle of Britain Bunker- the private bunker of Prime Minister Winston Churchill during World War II.

Central London’s business districts are accessible via tube or train- the journey takes approximately fifty minutes depending on peak times.

Vauxhall

Attractions

Vauxhall is one of the key districts in London, with outstanding connections all round and is home to a mixture of residential and industrial areas. While it doesn’t seem like the place for hordes of attractions, the fact is that the opposite is true, there is enough here both in terms of the city’s history and pleasure to keep any business or leisure travellers occupied.

  • Vauxhall Bridge

Opened in 1906, the Vauxhall Bridge is a Grade II listed structure that crosses the River Thames in a southeast-northwest direction between Vauxhall on the south bank and Pimlico on the north bank. With great views on both sides, walking across here is walking on history. It costs nothing to cross the bridge, so travellers can go back and forth as much as they please. Otu of all the things to do in Vauxhall, crossing the bridge will be one of them.

  • SIS Building

Seen in many James Bond movies, this is the UK’s juggernaut of national defence and foreign policy. While guests won’t be able to go inside and see 007 do his world-saving acts of heroism, they can still see the outside of the building from Vauxhall Bridge. Please bear in mind that no one can go inside the building, for national defence purposes.

  • Tate Britain

Across the Vauxhall Bridge is Tate Britain, home to the best artworks that the nations own have crafted throughout the many centuries. From the likes of JMW Turner to William Blake and so many others, this is one of the top galleries to see some of the most exquisite artworks ever drawn.

While entry is free, donating is encouraged and special exhibitions do cost - although the costs vary on the special exhibitions.

  • Vauxhall Park

Opened in 1890 by Albert, Prince of Wales, this Victorian park is one of many green areas in London but it is exclusive to this area. Complete with a playground for younger travellers, a cafe for weary adults and green green grass for the chilled visitors, the park is a tranquil area where all can get away from London’s hectic disposition.

  • Vauxhall City Farm

Run by a charity and home to numerous local projects throughout the year, the Vauxhall city Farm is there to bring a smile on all faces and to help the less fortunate, through education programmes, horse riding lessons and so much more that makes the hours pass by. Travellers that are staying in the area should come here to see how a community really comes together.

Museums in Vauxhall

Vauxhall is naturally renown for the sights of the river and SIS building, but there’s more to it and the surrounding area. It may not have all the big delights like those in Leicester Square but a few stops away on the Underground are some great museums that can be enjoyed by all, and add to the many things to do in Vauxhall.

  • Imperial War Museum

Discover the roots and causes of the two World Wars that brought devastation to millions. From the dark trenches to the advent of warfare in the air, bombing and other atrocious acts of humanity, explore some of weapons and tools that were used by the allies to win and learn why this should never happen again in our lifetimes. Visitors are advised that there are some aspects of the museum that can be very upsetting, like the Holocaust Exhibition.

While entry is free, visitors are encouraged to donate (it helps to keep the museum running) and some extra exhibitions aside from the free displays will vary in cost.

  • Tate Britain

Just across the Vauxhall Bridge is Tate Britain, home to the best artworks crafted by Britain’s greatest artists. From the likes of JMW Turner to William Blake and so many others, this is one of the top galleries to see some of the most exquisite artworks ever drawn by extraordinary geniuses in the Britsh Isles.

While entry is free, donating is encouraged and special exhibitions do cost - although the costs vary on the special exhibitions.

  • Cinema Museum

Just a few stops away in Kennington is the Cinema Museum, full of memorabilia and cinema history that will excite as well as fascinate. Those that are enticed by the silver screen will find much to appreciate here from all eras of film. With events on throughout the year and screening of special indie movies, this is a film lover’s dream come true.

Guided tours are £10 per adult and £7 for children.

  • The Guard’s Museum

By travelling to Westminster (not too far away once the Vauxhall Bridge is crossed), guests can find this treat...along with a few horses. The museum contains a wealth of information and artefacts relating to the five regiments of Foot Guards namely Grenadier, Coldstream, Scots, Irish and Welsh Guards. An eye-opening experience, this is definitely a must for those interested in history, military and history.

Tickets cost £8 for adults and children (under 16) go free as long as they’re accompanied by an adult. Senior citizens and ex-military personnel pay £5, whereas citizens serving in the military pay £2.

  • Churchill War Rooms

While WWII was raging across Europe and the world, Churchill ran the nation and the war effort from the war rooms below ground. WWII and Churchill aficionados will love touring the bunkers and seeing how the war was won in such a tight environment. While this was all kept secret in the day, guests can happily spill the beans to their friends and relatives and get them to come to one of the top museums in London.

For tickets, adults will have to pay £22 and children will pay £11 (aged 5-15). Various ticket packages can be bought for at various prices and IWM members go free.

Shopping

Out of all the many things to do in Vauxhall, shopping is most certainly one of them. No trip away from home is complete without a little dabble in consumer spending. Luckily, when it comes to shopping in Vauxhall, there are plenty of options to consider that will bring the spending adventure to a whole new level.

  • Greensmiths Market 

This market brings the butcher, the baker, the greengrocer and many others together under the same roof to give customers a wholesome experience. This is not just another supermarket. Visitors can also buy readymade meals cooked in the in-house kitchen here, themselves coming in a variety with plenty of available options to consider. The market is open from Monday to Friday, more than ideal for weekly shops.

  • Cardinal Place Shopping Centre 

This is a colourful and contemporary shopping destination in Victoria. It is a place with the best brands, shoes, clothes and accessories all within close distance. The site comprises three buildings covering a huge area. Some of the goodies here include Zara, Topshop, L'Occitane, Hobbs and Marks & Spencer. The establishment also houses restaurants such as Zizzi, Nando’s and Wagamama to make the experience totally enriching for all involved.

  • Other Shops

In Vauxhall, some of the best places for clothing are Cornucopia, I Knit London, Norton &Toensend, Redwood & Feller and Retro Mania. Whatever brands or clothing a visitor desires, they can find it in either of these shops, fancy or dressed down it doesn’t matter; it’s all here.

But there’s more. Those that love beautiful jewellery should try out Erickson Beamon. A truly inspired designer, Beamon offers pretty and very stylish jewellery that is ideal for any partner or fashion lover. Nominated for British Accessory Designer of 1999, this is more than worth a visit.

Food and Drink

Eating and drinking in Vauxhaul, a new city, are one of the many perks that travellers of all kinds look forward to. Tasting new cuisines is always a treat for anyone, as they never know what to expect. However, as Vauxhall is in London, there will be many cuisines to enjoy, from the traditional British cuisine to cuisines that are much further afield - after all, London is a global city.

  • Bonnington Café

Very unique and quirky, Bonnington Café is a haven for vegan lunches and quiet dinners. It is beautifully nestled in the quiet Bonnington square and is one of the top places to eat in Vauxhall for a smaller approach to dining for business and leisure travellers. Starters cost £3.50/£4.00, mains are £9.00 and desserts are £3.50/£4.00.

Address: 11 Vauxhall Grove, Vauxhall, London SW8 1TD

  • Casa Madeira

Located on Albert Embankment, Casa Madeira is a lively and simple restaurant serving pizzas, burgers and pastas along with all the other delights of Portuguese cuisine. The home-style food and old-school service is what makes this place different from all the other choices around the area. Given that it has been open for over 30 years, any guest is bound to find something they love here.

Address: 46b Albert Embankment, Lambeth, London SE1 7TL

  • Kennington Lane Café

An apt place to try British classics like fish and chips, this small and low-key place is known to serve a delicious meal for little money. People who have eaten here highly recommend the place and it’s of no surprise as tasty and nutritious food can be bought for a good price. Sandwiches, breakfasts, salads, kebabs and sweet desserts are just some of the choices on offer here.

Address: 383 Kennington Lane, Vauxhall, London SE11 5QY

  • Estrela Bar

The venue, Estrela Bar serves an eclectic range of Portuguese delicacies and is considered to be an excellent drinking option for those that want to go beyond the traditional approach. The atmosphere is informal, relaxed and of course Iberian - just what business and leisure travellers need after a long day in the city.

Address: 113 S Lambeth Rd, Stockwell, London SW8 1UZ

  • Waterfront London Vauxhall Restaurant

Close to the River Thames, this bar and brassiere is one of the top picks for everyone in the area. With a highly experienced team and a menu that includes all sorts, from steaks to Japanese food, burgers, seafood and much, much more, nights out here will never be regretted. Overall, a meal in this restaurant will go down a treat for everyone.

Address: 3 Street George Wharf, Vauxhall, London SW8 2LE

Churches and Cathdrals in Vauxhall

While modern times are more secular, churches and cathedrals are still places of attraction for visitors. When it comes to the like of Vauxhall, there a few choices that have all the architectural brilliance that the landmarks are known for. Walking around them is one way to waste away a few loose hours.

  • St Anne’s, Vauxhall

Built between 1903-07, St Anne’s is a catholic church, with its presbytery St Anne’s House next door. With a domineering quality and an interior that is welcoming to all followers of the denomination, St Anne’s will be a worthwhile venture for anyone looking to shed a few minutes from their day or followers that want that extra bit of comfort while they’re away.

  • St Peter’s Church, Vauxhall

Constructed in 1863, this is one of the few Grade II listed buildings in the area. While the exterior may look a bit drab, the interior is far more attractive and has the usual imposing and reverent nature that most would come to expect from a modern church. With such an elegant interior, this is one local landmark that is not to be missed.

  • St Anselms Church

Built in 1932–33 by Stanley Davenport Adshead and Stanley Churchill Ramsey, the St Anselms Church is another option to consider for those that love a sweet slice of architectural brilliance. While it may be more low key than the others on the list, it’s “barn-like” exterior is still one that makes it stand out from the rest.

Victoria

Located in the heart of the City of Westminster, Victoria is an ideal location for business travellers searching for a short commute to one of London’s business hubs. Boasting one of London’s most well connected stations, Victoria is a small district in central London. Named after Queen Victoria I, Victoria is predominantly comprised of commercial, private and social housing, with retail stores along the main streets.

Visually, Victoria is a combination of contemporary developments and Victorian era buildings that have been preserved. London Victoria Station, built in the late 19th century to coincide with London’s rapid expansion, is one of London's biggest stations and has a train, tube and bus station. Direct services to Gatwick Airport and Stansted Airport depart from Victoria on a frequent basis. The Circle, District and Victoria underground lines connect you to London’s most important business hubs.

Wembley

Located in the north west of London, Wembley is part of the London Borough of Brent. Home to the iconic Wembley Stadium, Wembley underwent a major regeneration project in 2004 to coincide with the construction of the stadium. The regeneration of the area has rendered the district one of the hottest up and coming areas in London.

Wembley possesses a rich history founded upon sport and music; Live Aid, the 1966 World Cup and countless more events have occurred in this historic district.

Travelling to central London’s business hubs is simple and quick. Liverpool Street Station and Canary Wharf are short journeys away whilst the Wembley Park Estate is a short car journey away.

Westminster

Located in the heart of the nation’s capital, the City of Westminster contains some of London’s most iconic sites including St James’ Palace, Buckingham Palace, 10 Downing Street and the Houses of Parliament. One of the oldest districts in London, the history of Westminster pre-dates the Norman Conquest of England.

East of the Royal Borough of Kensington and bordered on the south by the River Thames, the City of Westminster is the meet point between the modern metropolis and classical architecture preserved for posterity.

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